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Editors' Introduction: A Line in the Sand

Editors' Introduction: A Line in the Sand A Line in the Sand We are worried. We have decided to take our stand, to draw a line in the sand. We are worried about our poverty of memory and the consequences of remembering one part of our past to the exclusion of all the rest. Central themes in Southern history and Southern studies abound. To U. B. Phillips it was slavery. To Frank Owsley it was sectionalism and agrarianism. Grady McWhinney drew our attention to the Celtic survivals while Walter Johnson nominated the interstate slave trade. Other themes predominate after the Civil War--continuity versus change, the Prussian Road, progressivism, and civil rights, to cite a few examples. Each of these themes and most of the others, in practice, captures only the barest sliver of the South's deep history and experience, for such themes tend to find their origins in the early nineteenth century. Taken together, the metanarrative that arises from these themes only leaves us with an Old South that lasted but a handful of decades after the War of 1812, a New South that is still chugging along, and a deep impression that Southern social relations were singly derived from and are still predicated on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Native South University of Nebraska Press

Editors' Introduction: A Line in the Sand

Native South , Volume 1 (1) – Jan 27, 2008

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4025
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Abstract

A Line in the Sand We are worried. We have decided to take our stand, to draw a line in the sand. We are worried about our poverty of memory and the consequences of remembering one part of our past to the exclusion of all the rest. Central themes in Southern history and Southern studies abound. To U. B. Phillips it was slavery. To Frank Owsley it was sectionalism and agrarianism. Grady McWhinney drew our attention to the Celtic survivals while Walter Johnson nominated the interstate slave trade. Other themes predominate after the Civil War--continuity versus change, the Prussian Road, progressivism, and civil rights, to cite a few examples. Each of these themes and most of the others, in practice, captures only the barest sliver of the South's deep history and experience, for such themes tend to find their origins in the early nineteenth century. Taken together, the metanarrative that arises from these themes only leaves us with an Old South that lasted but a handful of decades after the War of 1812, a New South that is still chugging along, and a deep impression that Southern social relations were singly derived from and are still predicated on

Journal

Native SouthUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 27, 2008

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