Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Editor’s Note

Editor’s Note “Black theatre— go home! .  .  .  Go home psychically, mentally, aesthetically, and . . . physically.” Woodie King and Ron Milner’s 1970s optimistic call for a new Black theater strikes a sensitive chord during the current historical moment of Black Lives Matter and civil unrest. While theater artists King and Milner envisioned a nostalgic theater that embodied the truth of Black life as rooted in an authentic sense of community and embodiment, the United States continues to grapple with its dark legacy of devaluing Black life through surveillance, imprisonment, and violence. Th e quest to go “home”— to mine one’s deeply grounded sense of “belonging” for artistic inspiration— rubs sharply against the daily challenge of survival faced by many Black Americans, who oft en face the gravest of existential threats on the very streets near their homes. Th is special volume seeks to engage the diversity of voices that explore Black lives and Black stories via the live and recorded mediums of theater, fi lm, and video. Of central concern to these texts is the investigation of Black identities through the lenses of Black feminism, queer theory, love and desire, family, class, labor, land and geography, economics, forms of mobility and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/editor-s-note-WJM0cK1F7j
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © Frontiers Editorial Collective, Inc
ISSN
1536-0334

Abstract

“Black theatre— go home! .  .  .  Go home psychically, mentally, aesthetically, and . . . physically.” Woodie King and Ron Milner’s 1970s optimistic call for a new Black theater strikes a sensitive chord during the current historical moment of Black Lives Matter and civil unrest. While theater artists King and Milner envisioned a nostalgic theater that embodied the truth of Black life as rooted in an authentic sense of community and embodiment, the United States continues to grapple with its dark legacy of devaluing Black life through surveillance, imprisonment, and violence. Th e quest to go “home”— to mine one’s deeply grounded sense of “belonging” for artistic inspiration— rubs sharply against the daily challenge of survival faced by many Black Americans, who oft en face the gravest of existential threats on the very streets near their homes. Th is special volume seeks to engage the diversity of voices that explore Black lives and Black stories via the live and recorded mediums of theater, fi lm, and video. Of central concern to these texts is the investigation of Black identities through the lenses of Black feminism, queer theory, love and desire, family, class, labor, land and geography, economics, forms of mobility and

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 5, 2021

There are no references for this article.