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Editor's Note

Editor's Note EDITOR’S NOTE JEFFREY R. DI LEO The South Pacifi c has a narrative, but it is one more closely associated with the views of Western writers like James A. Michener than those of committed inhabitants of the region like the Tongan and Fijian writer and scholar Epeli Hau-ofa, whose work is introduced in this issue along with that of many other thought-provoking, committed writers and scholars from the region. This issue is about the latter group making its own theoretical claim to this region of the world—and wresting it from the appropriations of continental perspectives. But this is no easy task for it is a Western imaginary so strong that the very nomenclature of the region needs to be altered if there is any hope for it to shake its associations with a narrative that is at once embraced and disdained by inhabitants of the region. The progenitors of this continental narrative may have had affection for the region and its people, but nonetheless their vision of it is one that needs to be left behind. The success of works like Michener’s Tales of the South Pacifi c (1947) is partly to blame here. Written in 1946, when he http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke University of Nebraska Press

Editor's Note

symploke , Volume 26 (1) – Nov 28, 2018

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 symploke.
ISSN
1534-0627

Abstract

EDITOR’S NOTE JEFFREY R. DI LEO The South Pacifi c has a narrative, but it is one more closely associated with the views of Western writers like James A. Michener than those of committed inhabitants of the region like the Tongan and Fijian writer and scholar Epeli Hau-ofa, whose work is introduced in this issue along with that of many other thought-provoking, committed writers and scholars from the region. This issue is about the latter group making its own theoretical claim to this region of the world—and wresting it from the appropriations of continental perspectives. But this is no easy task for it is a Western imaginary so strong that the very nomenclature of the region needs to be altered if there is any hope for it to shake its associations with a narrative that is at once embraced and disdained by inhabitants of the region. The progenitors of this continental narrative may have had affection for the region and its people, but nonetheless their vision of it is one that needs to be left behind. The success of works like Michener’s Tales of the South Pacifi c (1947) is partly to blame here. Written in 1946, when he

Journal

symplokeUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Nov 28, 2018

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