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Don’t Give Me No Lip: The Cultural and Religious Roots of Leo Durocher’s Competitiveness

Don’t Give Me No Lip: The Cultural and Religious Roots of Leo Durocher’s Competitiveness Don't Give Me No Lip The Cultural and Religious Roots of Leo Durocher's Competitiveness jeffrey marlett I come to play! I come to beat you! I come to kill you! Leo Durocher, Nice Guys Finish Last All the stories of steroids and scandals aside, the American cultural imagination retains its faith in "the church of baseball." Narratives of religiosity pervade the scholarship surrounding baseball. For example, the sport's preference for tradition and ritual, the faith the sport and its teams inspire in fans, and the "green cathedrals" of ballparks themselves. Baseball possesses its own cognoscenti, an intellectual elite who appraise the game's more nuanced aspects. This tension between being an insider and an outsider within baseball recalls Ludwig Wittgenstein's argument that religious language resembles a kind of game. With both endeavors one learns by playing the game (or practicing the religion). Only later does intellectual affirmation provide new levels of deeper meaning. But what about the dark side? Almost all religions possess some notion of evil; the dualistic Other serves several purposes: temptation, damnation, and an instructive place in narrative lessons about what not to do. Joseph Price writes, "Classically, the dualistic, cosmic conflict pits the forces of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and Culture University of Nebraska Press

Don’t Give Me No Lip: The Cultural and Religious Roots of Leo Durocher’s Competitiveness

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1844
Publisher site
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Abstract

Don't Give Me No Lip The Cultural and Religious Roots of Leo Durocher's Competitiveness jeffrey marlett I come to play! I come to beat you! I come to kill you! Leo Durocher, Nice Guys Finish Last All the stories of steroids and scandals aside, the American cultural imagination retains its faith in "the church of baseball." Narratives of religiosity pervade the scholarship surrounding baseball. For example, the sport's preference for tradition and ritual, the faith the sport and its teams inspire in fans, and the "green cathedrals" of ballparks themselves. Baseball possesses its own cognoscenti, an intellectual elite who appraise the game's more nuanced aspects. This tension between being an insider and an outsider within baseball recalls Ludwig Wittgenstein's argument that religious language resembles a kind of game. With both endeavors one learns by playing the game (or practicing the religion). Only later does intellectual affirmation provide new levels of deeper meaning. But what about the dark side? Almost all religions possess some notion of evil; the dualistic Other serves several purposes: temptation, damnation, and an instructive place in narrative lessons about what not to do. Joseph Price writes, "Classically, the dualistic, cosmic conflict pits the forces of

Journal

NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and CultureUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Dec 1, 2012

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