Domesticity in Magical-Realist Postcolonial Fiction Reversals of Representation in Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children

Domesticity in Magical-Realist Postcolonial Fiction Reversals of Representation in Salman... Domesticity in Magical-Realist Postcolonial Fiction Reversals of Representation in Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children sara upstone Anne McClintock's assertion that "imperialism cannot be understood without a theory of domestic space" illustrates contemporary critical awareness that colonialism cannot be considered only in terms of "public" structures, such as the nation or city, but must also be debated in terms of its construction through the private lives of both colonizer and colonized.1 Against the anthropological tradition's repetition of the patriarchal division of public and private spheres--treating the house as a "self-contained world," the globe split between an inside of emotional dialogues and an outside of political negotiations, "intimacy and exposure, of private life and public space"--colonial discourse analysis focuses frequently on the home as a site of power contestation.2 "[C]onnected to, and perhaps stemming from, the principles of spatiality," as Bill Ashcroft has noted, ". . . the idea of enclosure, or property, has dominated colonizers' views of place."3 Postcolonial critics connect the home to political struggle: "a site of resistance" with "a radical political dimension."4 Not only does such a home distance itself from representations in geography, spatial theory, and conventional anthropology, it is at the same time distinguished from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

Domesticity in Magical-Realist Postcolonial Fiction Reversals of Representation in Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies, Volume 28 (1) – Jul 17, 2007

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Frontiers Editorial Collective. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
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Abstract

Domesticity in Magical-Realist Postcolonial Fiction Reversals of Representation in Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children sara upstone Anne McClintock's assertion that "imperialism cannot be understood without a theory of domestic space" illustrates contemporary critical awareness that colonialism cannot be considered only in terms of "public" structures, such as the nation or city, but must also be debated in terms of its construction through the private lives of both colonizer and colonized.1 Against the anthropological tradition's repetition of the patriarchal division of public and private spheres--treating the house as a "self-contained world," the globe split between an inside of emotional dialogues and an outside of political negotiations, "intimacy and exposure, of private life and public space"--colonial discourse analysis focuses frequently on the home as a site of power contestation.2 "[C]onnected to, and perhaps stemming from, the principles of spatiality," as Bill Ashcroft has noted, ". . . the idea of enclosure, or property, has dominated colonizers' views of place."3 Postcolonial critics connect the home to political struggle: "a site of resistance" with "a radical political dimension."4 Not only does such a home distance itself from representations in geography, spatial theory, and conventional anthropology, it is at the same time distinguished from

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jul 17, 2007

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