Decolonizing the Archaeological Landscape: The Practice and Politics of Archaeology in British Columbia

Decolonizing the Archaeological Landscape: The Practice and Politics of Archaeology in British... Decolonizing the Archaeological Landscape The Practice and Politics of Archaeology in British Columbia george p. nicholas In British Columbia, Canada, the practice of archaeology has been strongly influenced by issues of First Nations rights and the ways government and industry have chosen to address them. In turn, this situation has affected academic (i.e., research-based) and consulting (i.e., cultural resource management) archaeology, which have had to respond to changes in the provincial Heritage Conservation Act (hca) and to the implementation of archaeological overview assessments (aoas) and traditional-use studies (tuss).1 Protocols also encourage or require archaeologists to consult with First Nations regarding project design and implementation. However, the regional archaeological site assessment strategies and predictive models that are part of the process of heritage resource management have been viewed by First Nations as having mixed results, often falling short of either achieving a representative view of past land use activities (and a deeper understanding of their meaning) or adequately recognizing and protecting valued sites. While the consultation process has been politically motivated, it does encourage archaeologists to consider new research directions regarding past land use and its meaning. Worldwide, the incorporation of Indigenous explanations of past land use has often http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

Decolonizing the Archaeological Landscape: The Practice and Politics of Archaeology in British Columbia

The American Indian Quarterly, Volume 30 (3) – Jun 9, 2006

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
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Abstract

Decolonizing the Archaeological Landscape The Practice and Politics of Archaeology in British Columbia george p. nicholas In British Columbia, Canada, the practice of archaeology has been strongly influenced by issues of First Nations rights and the ways government and industry have chosen to address them. In turn, this situation has affected academic (i.e., research-based) and consulting (i.e., cultural resource management) archaeology, which have had to respond to changes in the provincial Heritage Conservation Act (hca) and to the implementation of archaeological overview assessments (aoas) and traditional-use studies (tuss).1 Protocols also encourage or require archaeologists to consult with First Nations regarding project design and implementation. However, the regional archaeological site assessment strategies and predictive models that are part of the process of heritage resource management have been viewed by First Nations as having mixed results, often falling short of either achieving a representative view of past land use activities (and a deeper understanding of their meaning) or adequately recognizing and protecting valued sites. While the consultation process has been politically motivated, it does encourage archaeologists to consider new research directions regarding past land use and its meaning. Worldwide, the incorporation of Indigenous explanations of past land use has often

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 9, 2006

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