Crafting Collaborative Archaeologies: Two Case Studies from New England

Crafting Collaborative Archaeologies: Two Case Studies from New England crafting collaborative archaeologies Two Case Studies from New England elizabeth s. chilton, University of Massachusetts, Amherst siobhan m. hart, Binghamton University Recently archaeologists in North America have sought to engage contemporary descendants and nondescendant local communities. In many cases this is a result of the longtime efforts of Indigenous communities (e.g., Atalay 2006; Kerber 2006; Nicholas 2006; Silliman 2008; Watkins 2003). Over the past twenty years many archaeologists have attempted to respond to community demands for transparency and have considered issues of relevance and consequences of scientific research through collaborative and community-based archaeology projects (for example, see the collections of essays in Kerber 2006 and Silliman 2008). At the same time, one of the greatest challenges facing archaeologists today is engaging the diverse individual and community stakeholders who make up pluralistic communities. Engaging multiple stakeholders means that there can be no "one size fits all" model of collaboration. This is certainly evident in New England, where the complexities of federal recognition, the diaspora of some Native communities, and the deep and conflicted colonial history present challenges to archaeologists in their attempts at--and in the possibilities for--collaboration. In this article we consider two major projects with which we have http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies University of Nebraska Press

Crafting Collaborative Archaeologies: Two Case Studies from New England

Collaborative Anthropologies, Volume 2 (1) – Feb 4, 2009

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
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2152-4009
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Abstract

crafting collaborative archaeologies Two Case Studies from New England elizabeth s. chilton, University of Massachusetts, Amherst siobhan m. hart, Binghamton University Recently archaeologists in North America have sought to engage contemporary descendants and nondescendant local communities. In many cases this is a result of the longtime efforts of Indigenous communities (e.g., Atalay 2006; Kerber 2006; Nicholas 2006; Silliman 2008; Watkins 2003). Over the past twenty years many archaeologists have attempted to respond to community demands for transparency and have considered issues of relevance and consequences of scientific research through collaborative and community-based archaeology projects (for example, see the collections of essays in Kerber 2006 and Silliman 2008). At the same time, one of the greatest challenges facing archaeologists today is engaging the diverse individual and community stakeholders who make up pluralistic communities. Engaging multiple stakeholders means that there can be no "one size fits all" model of collaboration. This is certainly evident in New England, where the complexities of federal recognition, the diaspora of some Native communities, and the deep and conflicted colonial history present challenges to archaeologists in their attempts at--and in the possibilities for--collaboration. In this article we consider two major projects with which we have

Journal

Collaborative AnthropologiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Feb 4, 2009

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