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Cover

Cover Gretchen VanWormer I tell my friend Brianna I’ve become obsessed with the prairie here in Oklahoma, that the rolling hills, the tallgrasses for miles, are the space beyond grief. She says, ‘‘Well, it’s certainly wide open.’’ Of course one of the main functions of a prairie is also to conceal. The sign at a prairie restoration project in Stillwater reads: ‘‘By establishing an area of native prairie, you can provide cover for a host of plant and animal species.’’) The Tallgrass Prairie Preserve in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, has a visitor cen- ter that doubles as a museum. The docent is delighted to hear that I’m new to the prairie and don’t have a working knowledge of the wildlife. She leads me to a pile of bones on a table, lifts one long, heavy example. With her free hand, she points to an illustration of a bison, its bones exposed like in an X-ray. ‘‘A bison’s hump isn’t like a camel’s,’’ she says. ‘‘A camel’s hump is soft. But you see the thickness of this bone? That’s what makes a bison so strong.’’ In the picture, the bison’s hump is full of stocky vertebrae. I ask if we’re allowed to touch http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prairie Schooner University of Nebraska Press

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1542-426X

Abstract

Gretchen VanWormer I tell my friend Brianna I’ve become obsessed with the prairie here in Oklahoma, that the rolling hills, the tallgrasses for miles, are the space beyond grief. She says, ‘‘Well, it’s certainly wide open.’’ Of course one of the main functions of a prairie is also to conceal. The sign at a prairie restoration project in Stillwater reads: ‘‘By establishing an area of native prairie, you can provide cover for a host of plant and animal species.’’) The Tallgrass Prairie Preserve in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, has a visitor cen- ter that doubles as a museum. The docent is delighted to hear that I’m new to the prairie and don’t have a working knowledge of the wildlife. She leads me to a pile of bones on a table, lifts one long, heavy example. With her free hand, she points to an illustration of a bison, its bones exposed like in an X-ray. ‘‘A bison’s hump isn’t like a camel’s,’’ she says. ‘‘A camel’s hump is soft. But you see the thickness of this bone? That’s what makes a bison so strong.’’ In the picture, the bison’s hump is full of stocky vertebrae. I ask if we’re allowed to touch

Journal

Prairie SchoonerUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Dec 21, 2019

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