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Consider the Lobster and Other Essays (review)

Consider the Lobster and Other Essays (review) Prairie Schooner David Foster Wallace. Consider the Lobster and Other Essays. Little, Brown. Reviewed by Michael Reid Busk In addition to his singular, pyrotechnic prose, encyclopedic mastery of disparate information systems, and an almost unparalleled breadth and depth of imagination, what makes David Foster Wallace's books interesting is that although they appear at first to be a grab-bag of unrelated topics, each one is in fact woven from a particular theme's thread: thus, the 1996 novel Infinite Jest and American entertainment culture, the 1999 story collection Brief Interviews with Hideous Men and male heterosexuality, and the 2003 story collection Oblivion and corporate despair. In Consider the Lobster, his most recent collection of essays, although his subjects range from pornography to dictionaries, Kafka to talk radio, crustacean neurology to sports autobiographies, the most fundamental issue is politics. In an era when every former politician and current talking head pens their screed about their own patriotism, virtue, and intelligence while attacking the other side of the aisle, Wallace is not merely refreshingly neutral but legitimately perceptive. Unlike most other writers, Wallace is neither a moralist, a satirist, nor an apologist, and because of it, he stands at a vantage from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prairie Schooner University of Nebraska Press

Consider the Lobster and Other Essays (review)

Prairie Schooner , Volume 82 (1) – May 11, 2008

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1542-426X
Publisher site
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Abstract

Prairie Schooner David Foster Wallace. Consider the Lobster and Other Essays. Little, Brown. Reviewed by Michael Reid Busk In addition to his singular, pyrotechnic prose, encyclopedic mastery of disparate information systems, and an almost unparalleled breadth and depth of imagination, what makes David Foster Wallace's books interesting is that although they appear at first to be a grab-bag of unrelated topics, each one is in fact woven from a particular theme's thread: thus, the 1996 novel Infinite Jest and American entertainment culture, the 1999 story collection Brief Interviews with Hideous Men and male heterosexuality, and the 2003 story collection Oblivion and corporate despair. In Consider the Lobster, his most recent collection of essays, although his subjects range from pornography to dictionaries, Kafka to talk radio, crustacean neurology to sports autobiographies, the most fundamental issue is politics. In an era when every former politician and current talking head pens their screed about their own patriotism, virtue, and intelligence while attacking the other side of the aisle, Wallace is not merely refreshingly neutral but legitimately perceptive. Unlike most other writers, Wallace is neither a moralist, a satirist, nor an apologist, and because of it, he stands at a vantage from

Journal

Prairie SchoonerUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 11, 2008

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