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Comparative Literature Without Borders: A Decennial Taking of Stock

Comparative Literature Without Borders: A Decennial Taking of Stock : A DECENNIAL TAKING OF STOCK1 1 There's nothing quite like the review of a program or of a department to focus the attention, and to induce alternating bouts of exhilaration, dread, and even occasional panic. While the bylaws of the American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) do not require periodic reviews as such, they do mandate the issuing of decennial reports on the "state of the discipline," which bring with them their own stresses and joys. Founded in 1960, ACLA has generated four such reports to date: 1965, 1975, 1993, and 2004, the most recent presented here in Comparative Literature in an Age of Globalization, along with eleven position papers on specific sub-fields and various issues as well as seven "responses." (The story goes that the person responsible for the 80s report was so dissatisfied with it that he never released it; these things happen, even in the best of associations.) It should be noted for clarity that a preoccupation with the discipline's American formation is evident in the first three reports, tendered under the chairmanship of, respectively, Harry Levin (1965), Thomas Greene (1975), and Charles Bernheimer (1993), and this is largely true of the report authored here http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke University of Nebraska Press

Comparative Literature Without Borders: A Decennial Taking of Stock

symploke , Volume 15 (1) – May 2, 2008

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Symplokē
ISSN
1534-0627
Publisher site
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Abstract

: A DECENNIAL TAKING OF STOCK1 1 There's nothing quite like the review of a program or of a department to focus the attention, and to induce alternating bouts of exhilaration, dread, and even occasional panic. While the bylaws of the American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) do not require periodic reviews as such, they do mandate the issuing of decennial reports on the "state of the discipline," which bring with them their own stresses and joys. Founded in 1960, ACLA has generated four such reports to date: 1965, 1975, 1993, and 2004, the most recent presented here in Comparative Literature in an Age of Globalization, along with eleven position papers on specific sub-fields and various issues as well as seven "responses." (The story goes that the person responsible for the 80s report was so dissatisfied with it that he never released it; these things happen, even in the best of associations.) It should be noted for clarity that a preoccupation with the discipline's American formation is evident in the first three reports, tendered under the chairmanship of, respectively, Harry Levin (1965), Thomas Greene (1975), and Charles Bernheimer (1993), and this is largely true of the report authored here

Journal

symplokeUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 2, 2008

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