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Combing the Snakes from His Hair (review)

Combing the Snakes from His Hair (review) SAIL . SPRING 2004 . VOL. 16, NO. 1 album, artwork, and diary entries about their own families after reading picture books about Native families including This Land is My Land (2003) by George Littlechild (Cree) and A Rainbow at Night: The World in Words and Pictures by Navajo Children (1996) by Bruce Hucko. This project encourages students to think about their own family culture, at the same time educating them about the cultural practices of class members. Although the analysis is often simplistic, the accumulation of detail in connection with good practices adds up to a solid basis for designing curriculums that includes Native people. In fact, throughout the book, Jones and Moomaw encourage teachers to invite American Indians to their classrooms in person and in print, music, and art. The authors also solidify how to make choices about curriculum involving American Indians in the final chapter with lists of guidelines teachers can consult when inviting Indian guests to their classes and when choosing picture books, toys, and other materials. Preschool and elementary teachers have the unenviable responsibility to teach well a wide variety of subjects (behavior, science, language, art, history, etc.). While I find the explanations http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

Combing the Snakes from His Hair (review)

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Ron Carpenter
ISSN
1548-9590
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SAIL . SPRING 2004 . VOL. 16, NO. 1 album, artwork, and diary entries about their own families after reading picture books about Native families including This Land is My Land (2003) by George Littlechild (Cree) and A Rainbow at Night: The World in Words and Pictures by Navajo Children (1996) by Bruce Hucko. This project encourages students to think about their own family culture, at the same time educating them about the cultural practices of class members. Although the analysis is often simplistic, the accumulation of detail in connection with good practices adds up to a solid basis for designing curriculums that includes Native people. In fact, throughout the book, Jones and Moomaw encourage teachers to invite American Indians to their classrooms in person and in print, music, and art. The authors also solidify how to make choices about curriculum involving American Indians in the final chapter with lists of guidelines teachers can consult when inviting Indian guests to their classes and when choosing picture books, toys, and other materials. Preschool and elementary teachers have the unenviable responsibility to teach well a wide variety of subjects (behavior, science, language, art, history, etc.). While I find the explanations

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 4, 2004

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