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Collecting among the Menomini: Cultural Assault in Twentieth-Century Wisconsin

Collecting among the Menomini: Cultural Assault in Twentieth-Century Wisconsin Collecting among the Menomini Cultural Assault in Twentieth-Century Wisconsin david r. m. beck We do not want to have any disagreement with the American Museum people and yet we can not let them skin the state without making all possible effort to get ahead of them where it can be done. . . . I presume if they get wind of you they will try to jump ahead of where you are working in order to get first pickings. Henry L. Ward, director of the Milwaukee Public Museum, to Samuel A. Barrett, curator of anthropology, July 12, 1910 Collectors and ethnologists launched an assault on the scale of an invasion in the cultural arena on the Menominee Reservation during the late nineteenth century. I began to consider the ways in which this assault has been incorporated into community memory in 1991, when I interviewed a distinguished tribal elder who vividly remembered a berry-picking outing with her sister and her mother decades earlier. On an otherwise beautiful day her mother returned from around the bend absolutely shocked and hurt because someone had opened graves and rifled them, scattering the remains. The person who told me this story did so http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

Collecting among the Menomini: Cultural Assault in Twentieth-Century Wisconsin

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 34 (2) – Apr 2, 2010

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1534-1828
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Abstract

Collecting among the Menomini Cultural Assault in Twentieth-Century Wisconsin david r. m. beck We do not want to have any disagreement with the American Museum people and yet we can not let them skin the state without making all possible effort to get ahead of them where it can be done. . . . I presume if they get wind of you they will try to jump ahead of where you are working in order to get first pickings. Henry L. Ward, director of the Milwaukee Public Museum, to Samuel A. Barrett, curator of anthropology, July 12, 1910 Collectors and ethnologists launched an assault on the scale of an invasion in the cultural arena on the Menominee Reservation during the late nineteenth century. I began to consider the ways in which this assault has been incorporated into community memory in 1991, when I interviewed a distinguished tribal elder who vividly remembered a berry-picking outing with her sister and her mother decades earlier. On an otherwise beautiful day her mother returned from around the bend absolutely shocked and hurt because someone had opened graves and rifled them, scattering the remains. The person who told me this story did so

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Apr 2, 2010

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