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Collaborative Anthropology as Twenty-first-Century Ethical Anthropology

Collaborative Anthropology as Twenty-first-Century Ethical Anthropology carolyn fluehr-lobban, Rhode Island College Since 1991 I have argued that collaborative research--that is, research that involves research participants/collaborators as partners in the research process--is "ethically conscious" research (see Fluehr-Lobban 1991, 2003). Not only is collaborative research ethical, and thus morally preferable to historical models of research, but it is better research because its methodology emphasizes multiple, polyphonic perspectives, which will leave a richer heritage of ethnography to subsequent generations of ethically conscious researchers. Collaborative research involves the people who are studied in an active way, as individuals or groups having vested interests in the project through their participation in the research design, execution, publication, and outcomes potentially related to community or individual improvement of well-being. Collaborative studies can potentially inform or affect social policy. Often, jointly directed and jointly authored projects replace the older, more hierarchical model of research planned, executed, and published by the anthropologist alone. Community or individual collaboration in research--with partnership incorporated in every phase of the research--becomes a condition for its success, not simply a fortuitous by-product of work with communities. This newer model of research presumes, for the most part, a literate, socially conscious set of partners who not only participate in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies University of Nebraska Press

Collaborative Anthropology as Twenty-first-Century Ethical Anthropology

Collaborative Anthropologies , Volume 1 (1) – Jan 26, 2008

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4009
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Abstract

carolyn fluehr-lobban, Rhode Island College Since 1991 I have argued that collaborative research--that is, research that involves research participants/collaborators as partners in the research process--is "ethically conscious" research (see Fluehr-Lobban 1991, 2003). Not only is collaborative research ethical, and thus morally preferable to historical models of research, but it is better research because its methodology emphasizes multiple, polyphonic perspectives, which will leave a richer heritage of ethnography to subsequent generations of ethically conscious researchers. Collaborative research involves the people who are studied in an active way, as individuals or groups having vested interests in the project through their participation in the research design, execution, publication, and outcomes potentially related to community or individual improvement of well-being. Collaborative studies can potentially inform or affect social policy. Often, jointly directed and jointly authored projects replace the older, more hierarchical model of research planned, executed, and published by the anthropologist alone. Community or individual collaboration in research--with partnership incorporated in every phase of the research--becomes a condition for its success, not simply a fortuitous by-product of work with communities. This newer model of research presumes, for the most part, a literate, socially conscious set of partners who not only participate in

Journal

Collaborative AnthropologiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 26, 2008

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