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Collaborative and Non-Collaborative Exhibits: James Mooney and Displaying Kiowa Culture

Collaborative and Non-Collaborative Exhibits: James Mooney and Displaying Kiowa Culture narrative) of North American peoples, thereby conveying a differentiated understanding of particular cultures or tribes, social groups that today are called Native or First Nations. This shift would eventually replace the homogeneous representation of "the primitive before" with ethnographic displays of distinctive indigenous people as unique parts of humanity's present, not simply as survivals of humankind's past. Moving toward more culturally specif- Table 1. Model of exhibit types in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century ethnology Exhibit Focus Technological developmental and object synthetic series; taxonomic Variables Culture, place and history unimportant; once categorized by stages; cultures interchangeable Categorical or regional variation emphasized; adaptation and place matter Distinctive cultures matter; cultural particularism but focus on "pure" cultures, not contaminated by European contact; this leads to an emphasis on what epitomizes or is important to a culture Time matters as well as internal variation within the culture and place; emphasis on change and stability Approach Comparative ethno-logy to show material types, distribution, invention, and evolution Comparative ethnology to show cultural or tribal characteristics Non-comparative ethnography, salvage ethnography Collaboration Level No collaboration with source communities needed Geographical, ecology, linguistic, culture areas Collaboration with source community seen as optional Individual cultures Collaboration needed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies University of Nebraska Press

Collaborative and Non-Collaborative Exhibits: James Mooney and Displaying Kiowa Culture

Collaborative Anthropologies , Volume 7 (2) – Mar 26, 2015

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4009
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Abstract

narrative) of North American peoples, thereby conveying a differentiated understanding of particular cultures or tribes, social groups that today are called Native or First Nations. This shift would eventually replace the homogeneous representation of "the primitive before" with ethnographic displays of distinctive indigenous people as unique parts of humanity's present, not simply as survivals of humankind's past. Moving toward more culturally specif- Table 1. Model of exhibit types in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century ethnology Exhibit Focus Technological developmental and object synthetic series; taxonomic Variables Culture, place and history unimportant; once categorized by stages; cultures interchangeable Categorical or regional variation emphasized; adaptation and place matter Distinctive cultures matter; cultural particularism but focus on "pure" cultures, not contaminated by European contact; this leads to an emphasis on what epitomizes or is important to a culture Time matters as well as internal variation within the culture and place; emphasis on change and stability Approach Comparative ethno-logy to show material types, distribution, invention, and evolution Comparative ethnology to show cultural or tribal characteristics Non-comparative ethnography, salvage ethnography Collaboration Level No collaboration with source communities needed Geographical, ecology, linguistic, culture areas Collaboration with source community seen as optional Individual cultures Collaboration needed

Journal

Collaborative AnthropologiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Mar 26, 2015

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