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Closing the Open Signification: Forms of Transmedial Storyworlds and Chronotopoi in Comics

Closing the Open Signification: Forms of Transmedial Storyworlds and Chronotopoi in Comics Closing the Open Signification Forms of Transmedial Storyworlds and Chronotopoi in Comics Stephan Packard Bakhtin's concept of the chronotopos offers a unique and often underappreciated perspective on the relation between depictive space and depicted temporal structures.1 Such relations in turn govern genres and take part in the convergence of stories toward transmedial storyworlds. On the following pages I will focus on Marvel's transmedial universe as developed from comic books in order to make three points: first, a chronotopic view yields special insight into the negotiations of storyworld building; second, it showcases some of the operations employed in the historical process that assembles transmedial storyworlds; and third, in comic books it brings into contrast shared spaces alongside shared characters as particular intermedial traces in transmedial storyworlds, with chronotopic markers closing the typically open signification of the spatial domains in comic panels. Storyworlds and Chronotopoi In Amazing Spider-Man #8 (1964), Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, and Steve Ditko begin the issue's second story with a splash page divided into two vertical spaces. The first space (on the left-hand side of the page) shows Spider-Man from the back, crawling up a wall that also serves as the separating line between the two http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png StoryWorlds: A Journal of Narrative Studies University of Nebraska Press

Closing the Open Signification: Forms of Transmedial Storyworlds and Chronotopoi in Comics

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2156-7204
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Abstract

Closing the Open Signification Forms of Transmedial Storyworlds and Chronotopoi in Comics Stephan Packard Bakhtin's concept of the chronotopos offers a unique and often underappreciated perspective on the relation between depictive space and depicted temporal structures.1 Such relations in turn govern genres and take part in the convergence of stories toward transmedial storyworlds. On the following pages I will focus on Marvel's transmedial universe as developed from comic books in order to make three points: first, a chronotopic view yields special insight into the negotiations of storyworld building; second, it showcases some of the operations employed in the historical process that assembles transmedial storyworlds; and third, in comic books it brings into contrast shared spaces alongside shared characters as particular intermedial traces in transmedial storyworlds, with chronotopic markers closing the typically open signification of the spatial domains in comic panels. Storyworlds and Chronotopoi In Amazing Spider-Man #8 (1964), Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, and Steve Ditko begin the issue's second story with a splash page divided into two vertical spaces. The first space (on the left-hand side of the page) shows Spider-Man from the back, crawling up a wall that also serves as the separating line between the two

Journal

StoryWorlds: A Journal of Narrative StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Nov 25, 2015

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