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"Click = Kill": Textual You in Ludic Digital Fiction

"Click = Kill": Textual You in Ludic Digital Fiction "Click = Kill" Textual You in Ludic Digital Fiction Astrid Ensslin and Alice Bell Since the early days of hypertext criticism, the study of digital fiction has undergone a significant paradigm shift.1 Recent research has moved from a first wave of mostly theoretical and philosophical debate to a second wave of close stylistic and semiotic analysis. While the theoretical intricacies of second-wave digital fiction theory have been much discussed (e.g. Ciccoricco 2007; Ensslin 2007; Ensslin and Bell 2007; Bell 2010), the discipline and practice of close reading digital fiction require a more systematic engagement with the possibilities and limitations of the form. Similarly, the narratological tools and terminologies inherited from print scholarship need to be adapted to the medial, material, and discursive qualities of digital fiction.2 In seeking to exemplify this research agenda, this article offers a close-reading of geniwate and Deena Larsen's satirical, ludic Flash fiction The Princess Murderer (2003),3 with a specific focus on how the text implements second-person narration and other forms of the textual you (Herman 1994, 2002) in juxtaposition with other narrational stances. The [somewhat dis- turbing but highly improbable] Princess Murderer (henceforth abbreviated as TPM) mixes thematic elements of the Romantic Fairytale, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png StoryWorlds: A Journal of Narrative Studies uni_neb

"Click = Kill": Textual You in Ludic Digital Fiction

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2156-7204
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

"Click = Kill" Textual You in Ludic Digital Fiction Astrid Ensslin and Alice Bell Since the early days of hypertext criticism, the study of digital fiction has undergone a significant paradigm shift.1 Recent research has moved from a first wave of mostly theoretical and philosophical debate to a second wave of close stylistic and semiotic analysis. While the theoretical intricacies of second-wave digital fiction theory have been much discussed (e.g. Ciccoricco 2007; Ensslin 2007; Ensslin and Bell 2007; Bell 2010), the discipline and practice of close reading digital fiction require a more systematic engagement with the possibilities and limitations of the form. Similarly, the narratological tools and terminologies inherited from print scholarship need to be adapted to the medial, material, and discursive qualities of digital fiction.2 In seeking to exemplify this research agenda, this article offers a close-reading of geniwate and Deena Larsen's satirical, ludic Flash fiction The Princess Murderer (2003),3 with a specific focus on how the text implements second-person narration and other forms of the textual you (Herman 1994, 2002) in juxtaposition with other narrational stances. The [somewhat dis- turbing but highly improbable] Princess Murderer (henceforth abbreviated as TPM) mixes thematic elements of the Romantic Fairytale,

Journal

StoryWorlds: A Journal of Narrative Studiesuni_neb

Published: Jun 16, 2012

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