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Changing Times

Changing Times Helen Cafferty Looking back to 1987 when I became co-editor of the Women in German Yearbook with Jeanette Clausen, it appears to me as a distant time in a different world--before the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, before the watershed of 9/11, before the election of Barack Obama. Like a misty horizon lost in fog, that time feels remote, as though we have all moved on to other things. I had felt a lot of isolation in my job at Bowdoin since my arrival as one of four women faculty in 1972, which had coincided with the college's ambivalent embrace of co-education. For me, WiG had created an environment that supported my rejection of careerism and the obligatory Seilschaften (a patronage system, which at that time was almost completely male). It had informed me in my engagement in affirmative action politics on my campus and had compensated me for the persistent feeling of being marginalized as a woman at an all-male college transitioning to co-education. At the same time, I wanted to succeed as a scholar: I felt a strong conflict as I went about my career in those days. WiG was itself a lifeline; I http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Women in German Yearbook: Feminist Studies in German Literature & Culture uni_neb

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1940-512X
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Abstract

Helen Cafferty Looking back to 1987 when I became co-editor of the Women in German Yearbook with Jeanette Clausen, it appears to me as a distant time in a different world--before the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, before the watershed of 9/11, before the election of Barack Obama. Like a misty horizon lost in fog, that time feels remote, as though we have all moved on to other things. I had felt a lot of isolation in my job at Bowdoin since my arrival as one of four women faculty in 1972, which had coincided with the college's ambivalent embrace of co-education. For me, WiG had created an environment that supported my rejection of careerism and the obligatory Seilschaften (a patronage system, which at that time was almost completely male). It had informed me in my engagement in affirmative action politics on my campus and had compensated me for the persistent feeling of being marginalized as a woman at an all-male college transitioning to co-education. At the same time, I wanted to succeed as a scholar: I felt a strong conflict as I went about my career in those days. WiG was itself a lifeline; I

Journal

Women in German Yearbook: Feminist Studies in German Literature & Cultureuni_neb

Published: Nov 7, 2009

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