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Changing Rapture: Emily Dickinson's Poetic Development (review)

Changing Rapture: Emily Dickinson's Poetic Development (review) dle ground. in any case, robbins's clearly written overview of Stowe studies is one of the most thorough accounts of where the criticism currently stands and, therefore, points to where it might go next. The Cambridge Introduction to Harriet Beecher Stowe is an ideal place for students and critics to begin in the process of advancing Stowe scholarship to its next stage. changing Rapture: emily Dickinson's Poetic Development. by Aliki barnstone. Hanover: university press of new England, 2006. xiii + 187 pp. $45.00. reviewed by Jane Donahue Eberwein, Oakland university liki barnstone challenges the notion that Emily Dickinson's poetry exhibits no development by arguing that her writing fell into three stages: the first dominated by her struggle with Calvinism, the second strongly influenced by Emerson, and the third exhibiting a relational poetic that no longer differentiated between poetry and prose. this approach to Dickinson is, in some ways, a familiar one, strongly influenced by both Hyatt Waggoner and Susan Howe. What freshens barnstone's approach is that she links cultural history with feminism and manuscript study while approaching her inquiry with the artistic insights and lucid prose of an accomplished poet witnessing delightedly to the emergence of a twentieth-century http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Legacy University of Nebraska Press

Changing Rapture: Emily Dickinson's Poetic Development (review)

Legacy , Volume 26 (1) – Jun 3, 2009

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1534-0643
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Abstract

dle ground. in any case, robbins's clearly written overview of Stowe studies is one of the most thorough accounts of where the criticism currently stands and, therefore, points to where it might go next. The Cambridge Introduction to Harriet Beecher Stowe is an ideal place for students and critics to begin in the process of advancing Stowe scholarship to its next stage. changing Rapture: emily Dickinson's Poetic Development. by Aliki barnstone. Hanover: university press of new England, 2006. xiii + 187 pp. $45.00. reviewed by Jane Donahue Eberwein, Oakland university liki barnstone challenges the notion that Emily Dickinson's poetry exhibits no development by arguing that her writing fell into three stages: the first dominated by her struggle with Calvinism, the second strongly influenced by Emerson, and the third exhibiting a relational poetic that no longer differentiated between poetry and prose. this approach to Dickinson is, in some ways, a familiar one, strongly influenced by both Hyatt Waggoner and Susan Howe. What freshens barnstone's approach is that she links cultural history with feminism and manuscript study while approaching her inquiry with the artistic insights and lucid prose of an accomplished poet witnessing delightedly to the emergence of a twentieth-century

Journal

LegacyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 3, 2009

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