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Chains of Emancipation: Place Attachment and the Great Northern Migration in Paul Laurence Dunbar's The Sport of the Gods

Chains of Emancipation: Place Attachment and the Great Northern Migration in Paul Laurence... Chains of Emancipation Place Attachment and the Great Northern Migration in Paul Laurence Dunbar's The Sport of the Gods Jillmarie Murphy, Union College Tis an old deserted homestead On the outskirts of the town, Where the roof is all moss-covered, And the walls are tumbling down; But around that little cottage Do my brightest mem'ries cling, For 'twas there I spent the moments Of my youth,--life's happy spring. --Dunbar, "The Old Homestead" (Collected 283) The October 1901 edition of The Southern Workman extols Paul Laurence Dunbar's creative talents in his fourth novel, The Sport of the Gods (1901), stating that Dunbar includes "some bits of sarcasm that would not have been unworthy of Dickens, and shows on the whole a promise for the future of which no young novel writer need be ashamed" ("Book Reviews" 557). That said, The Sport of the Gods was destined to be not only Dunbar's most successful novel but also his last and his only novel to focus almost exclusively on African-American characters. Often read as a text that reveals the cultural exigencies of African-American freedom, the political, cultural, and social identity of which was still forming during Dunbar's life, The Sport of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Naturalism University of Nebraska Press

Chains of Emancipation: Place Attachment and the Great Northern Migration in Paul Laurence Dunbar's The Sport of the Gods

Studies in American Naturalism , Volume 8 (2) – Feb 26, 2013

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1944-6519
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Abstract

Chains of Emancipation Place Attachment and the Great Northern Migration in Paul Laurence Dunbar's The Sport of the Gods Jillmarie Murphy, Union College Tis an old deserted homestead On the outskirts of the town, Where the roof is all moss-covered, And the walls are tumbling down; But around that little cottage Do my brightest mem'ries cling, For 'twas there I spent the moments Of my youth,--life's happy spring. --Dunbar, "The Old Homestead" (Collected 283) The October 1901 edition of The Southern Workman extols Paul Laurence Dunbar's creative talents in his fourth novel, The Sport of the Gods (1901), stating that Dunbar includes "some bits of sarcasm that would not have been unworthy of Dickens, and shows on the whole a promise for the future of which no young novel writer need be ashamed" ("Book Reviews" 557). That said, The Sport of the Gods was destined to be not only Dunbar's most successful novel but also his last and his only novel to focus almost exclusively on African-American characters. Often read as a text that reveals the cultural exigencies of African-American freedom, the political, cultural, and social identity of which was still forming during Dunbar's life, The Sport of

Journal

Studies in American NaturalismUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Feb 26, 2013

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