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Centering Anishinaabeg Studies: Understanding the World through Stories ed. by Jill Doerfler, Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair, and Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark (review)

Centering Anishinaabeg Studies: Understanding the World through Stories ed. by Jill Doerfler,... Reviews Jill Doerfler, Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair, and Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark, eds. Centering Anishinaabeg Studies: Understanding the World through Stories. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 2013. 446 pp. Paper, $29.95. Carrie Louise Sheffield, University of Tennessee, Knoxville For many non-Indigenous peoples in Canada and the United States, the stories that shape our lives are normalized as truth, while Indigenous stories, such as those discussed in Centering, are designated as simple, primitive, and historical myth. However, as Doerfler, Sinclair, Stark, and the excellent contributors to this volume show, Anishinaabe stories are not merely entertainment; they are active, living beings in Anishinaabe culture, life, and identity. The preface, a contemporary Trickster narrative written by John Borrows, sets the tone of this valuable collection. Nanaboozho is hungry and looking for food. Along the way, he meets three scholars, Doerfler, Sinclair, and Stark (represented as a lynx, a fish, and a bear), who need help gathering the stories that constitute Centering. Still searching for food, Nanaboozho lures them into an outhouse and convinces them to jump through the hole. In a retelling of an Anishinaabe creation story, they land on Turtle's back and are asked to dive into the depths of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

Centering Anishinaabeg Studies: Understanding the World through Stories ed. by Jill Doerfler, Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair, and Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark (review)

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1828
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Abstract

Reviews Jill Doerfler, Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair, and Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark, eds. Centering Anishinaabeg Studies: Understanding the World through Stories. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 2013. 446 pp. Paper, $29.95. Carrie Louise Sheffield, University of Tennessee, Knoxville For many non-Indigenous peoples in Canada and the United States, the stories that shape our lives are normalized as truth, while Indigenous stories, such as those discussed in Centering, are designated as simple, primitive, and historical myth. However, as Doerfler, Sinclair, Stark, and the excellent contributors to this volume show, Anishinaabe stories are not merely entertainment; they are active, living beings in Anishinaabe culture, life, and identity. The preface, a contemporary Trickster narrative written by John Borrows, sets the tone of this valuable collection. Nanaboozho is hungry and looking for food. Along the way, he meets three scholars, Doerfler, Sinclair, and Stark (represented as a lynx, a fish, and a bear), who need help gathering the stories that constitute Centering. Still searching for food, Nanaboozho lures them into an outhouse and convinces them to jump through the hole. In a retelling of an Anishinaabe creation story, they land on Turtle's back and are asked to dive into the depths of the

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Oct 9, 2015

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