Blood Narrative: Indigenous Identity in American Indian and Maori Literary and Activist Texts (review)

Blood Narrative: Indigenous Identity in American Indian and Maori Literary and Activist Texts... minations in recovered texts such as this one. Second, I think the book is important as women's writing because, through Chamberlain's stories and sketches, we see how gender discrimination bloomed in the nineteenth century, and we are privy to the concerns of early women laborers. Most of Chamberlain's writings were published in the newspapers of the mills near Lowell, Massachusetts, and are concerned with "Native Tales and Dream Visions," "Women's Concerns," and "Village Sketches." In this first section, "Native Tales," there are only two very short writings that have anything to do at all with Native people. And, though both seem to be "sympathetic" to Indian people, the first, "Fireside Scene" is rather disturbing--a graphic description about the mass destruction and burning of a Miami village (125­126). The other seems to be a re-telling of the story about a white woman who is kind to an Indian man, after her husband is hostile toward him. Later, the Native man "returns the favor" by saving her husband, even though the husband mistreated him. These two "tales" seem to be more in the genre of the New England reformist writings popular during that era rather than Native writing. Both emanate http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

Blood Narrative: Indigenous Identity in American Indian and Maori Literary and Activist Texts (review)

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by the Susan A. (Susan Allison) Miller.
ISSN
1548-9590
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

minations in recovered texts such as this one. Second, I think the book is important as women's writing because, through Chamberlain's stories and sketches, we see how gender discrimination bloomed in the nineteenth century, and we are privy to the concerns of early women laborers. Most of Chamberlain's writings were published in the newspapers of the mills near Lowell, Massachusetts, and are concerned with "Native Tales and Dream Visions," "Women's Concerns," and "Village Sketches." In this first section, "Native Tales," there are only two very short writings that have anything to do at all with Native people. And, though both seem to be "sympathetic" to Indian people, the first, "Fireside Scene" is rather disturbing--a graphic description about the mass destruction and burning of a Miami village (125­126). The other seems to be a re-telling of the story about a white woman who is kind to an Indian man, after her husband is hostile toward him. Later, the Native man "returns the favor" by saving her husband, even though the husband mistreated him. These two "tales" seem to be more in the genre of the New England reformist writings popular during that era rather than Native writing. Both emanate

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Nov 28, 2005

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