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Blood, Bodies, and Violence: Gender and Women's Embodied Agency in the Egyptian Uprisings

Blood, Bodies, and Violence: Gender and Women's Embodied Agency in the Egyptian Uprisings Blood, Bodies, and Violence Gender and Women’s Embodied Agency in the Egyptian Uprisings Kathrine van den Bogert December 2011. It is only my fi rst week in Egypt when Omar and Amir take me for a tour to Tahrir Square. At that moment there are no massive protests or marches, but the whole square still breathes revolution: many street sellers with Egyptian fl ags, scarves, and T- shirts; tents; a stage with a protest singer and supporters; dolls that represent Mubarak and Tantawi; and maybe the most striking for Tahrir Square: no traffi c. It feels like an amazing festival at- mosphere with elated people, but signs of the violence that happened there are still very much present: some buildings in the square have been destroyed by fi re, the Egyptian Museum is partly damaged, Amir points to the rooft ops from which snipers were shooting at the protestors, and the bullet holes in the buildings and street signs are uncountable. Th e blocks and barbed wire that were raised in the streets to prevent protestors from entering give me the feel- ing of a war zone. But only when Omar shows me the spot where he was hid- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies uni_neb

Blood, Bodies, and Violence: Gender and Women's Embodied Agency in the Egyptian Uprisings

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © Frontiers Editorial Collective, Inc
ISSN
1536-0334

Abstract

Blood, Bodies, and Violence Gender and Women’s Embodied Agency in the Egyptian Uprisings Kathrine van den Bogert December 2011. It is only my fi rst week in Egypt when Omar and Amir take me for a tour to Tahrir Square. At that moment there are no massive protests or marches, but the whole square still breathes revolution: many street sellers with Egyptian fl ags, scarves, and T- shirts; tents; a stage with a protest singer and supporters; dolls that represent Mubarak and Tantawi; and maybe the most striking for Tahrir Square: no traffi c. It feels like an amazing festival at- mosphere with elated people, but signs of the violence that happened there are still very much present: some buildings in the square have been destroyed by fi re, the Egyptian Museum is partly damaged, Amir points to the rooft ops from which snipers were shooting at the protestors, and the bullet holes in the buildings and street signs are uncountable. Th e blocks and barbed wire that were raised in the streets to prevent protestors from entering give me the feel- ing of a war zone. But only when Omar shows me the spot where he was hid-

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studiesuni_neb

Published: Jul 25, 2019

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