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Behind the Shadows of Wounded Knee: The Slippage of Imagination in Wynema: A Child of the Forest

Behind the Shadows of Wounded Knee: The Slippage of Imagination in Wynema: A Child of the Forest Tatonetti: Behind the Shadows of Wounded Knee Behind the Shadows of Wounded Knee The Slippage of Imagination in Wynema: A Child of the Forest LISA TATONETTI What did it mean to be the first generation to hear the stories of the past, bear the horrors of the moment, and write to the future? What were tribal identities at the turn of the last century? Gerald Vizenor, Manifest Manners Muskogee Creek author Sophia Alice Callahan's novel, Wynema: A Child of the Forest, the first known novel by an American Indian woman, is remarkable on a number of levels.1 Of particular interest is her attention to the 1890 Lakota Ghost Dance and the Wounded Knee massacre that took place less than six months before the novel's spring 1891 publication.2 Callahan's text offers the first fictional re-creation of both the messianic religious movement that reached the Pine Ridge Reservation in the spring of 1890 and the infamous slaughter of Lakota men, women, and children that occurred on December 29 of that same year.3 Historically, these two events have been melded together in innumerable tragic retellings that have transformed two separate historical moments into a singular symbol of loss in which allusion http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

Behind the Shadows of Wounded Knee: The Slippage of Imagination in Wynema: A Child of the Forest

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Lisa Tatonetti
ISSN
1548-9590
Publisher site
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Abstract

Tatonetti: Behind the Shadows of Wounded Knee Behind the Shadows of Wounded Knee The Slippage of Imagination in Wynema: A Child of the Forest LISA TATONETTI What did it mean to be the first generation to hear the stories of the past, bear the horrors of the moment, and write to the future? What were tribal identities at the turn of the last century? Gerald Vizenor, Manifest Manners Muskogee Creek author Sophia Alice Callahan's novel, Wynema: A Child of the Forest, the first known novel by an American Indian woman, is remarkable on a number of levels.1 Of particular interest is her attention to the 1890 Lakota Ghost Dance and the Wounded Knee massacre that took place less than six months before the novel's spring 1891 publication.2 Callahan's text offers the first fictional re-creation of both the messianic religious movement that reached the Pine Ridge Reservation in the spring of 1890 and the infamous slaughter of Lakota men, women, and children that occurred on December 29 of that same year.3 Historically, these two events have been melded together in innumerable tragic retellings that have transformed two separate historical moments into a singular symbol of loss in which allusion

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 4, 2004

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