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Becoming a Georgian Woman

Becoming a Georgian Woman but to my own physical body and to the bodies of those closely related to me. Georgians often claim that theirs is a "Christian" country, by which they mean a society kinder to women and indeed to all human beings than the societies of their Muslim neighbors: Iran, Azerbaijan, and Turkey. My experience of becoming a Georgian woman (to employ the phrase figuratively) suggests that the line dividing Christianity from Islam is far less significant Gould: Becoming a Georgian Woman 127 in the realm of gender relations than the line dividing men from women, the line that creates patriarchy. If the former impacts Georgian self-perception, and therefore may be consigned to the superstructure of ideology, the latter overdetermines a body's trajectory; it adjudicates over life and death to the extent that religious and cultural differences become surrounded in halos of triviality. The common thread linking contemporary Georgian to Iranian and Muslim Chechen culture is patriarchy, the domination of women not (only) by men but by structures that actively militate against their welfare and that women in large measure participate in consolidating. Recent transnational feminist scholarship has clarified that patriarchy is not overdetermined by religion, and has helpfully focused http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

but to my own physical body and to the bodies of those closely related to me. Georgians often claim that theirs is a "Christian" country, by which they mean a society kinder to women and indeed to all human beings than the societies of their Muslim neighbors: Iran, Azerbaijan, and Turkey. My experience of becoming a Georgian woman (to employ the phrase figuratively) suggests that the line dividing Christianity from Islam is far less significant Gould: Becoming a Georgian Woman 127 in the realm of gender relations than the line dividing men from women, the line that creates patriarchy. If the former impacts Georgian self-perception, and therefore may be consigned to the superstructure of ideology, the latter overdetermines a body's trajectory; it adjudicates over life and death to the extent that religious and cultural differences become surrounded in halos of triviality. The common thread linking contemporary Georgian to Iranian and Muslim Chechen culture is patriarchy, the domination of women not (only) by men but by structures that actively militate against their welfare and that women in large measure participate in consolidating. Recent transnational feminist scholarship has clarified that patriarchy is not overdetermined by religion, and has helpfully focused

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Aug 28, 2010

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