"Baseball for the Insane": The Middletown State Homeopathic Hospital and its "Asylums"

"Baseball for the Insane": The Middletown State Homeopathic Hospital and its "Asylums" "Baseball for the Insane" The Middletown State Homeopathic Hospital and its "Asylums" james e. overmyer Dr. Selden Haines Talcott, superintendent of the Middletown State Homeopathic Hospital in Orange County, New York, had progressive ideas about how to treat the mentally ill. In a time not long after the basic treatment for "lunatics" was to warehouse them in asylums and poorhouses, Talcott believed a healthy mind should reside in a healthy body. As he put it, "the physical means for recuperating the worn and wasted systems of the insane may be stated in three words--heat, milk, and rest, and the greatest of these is rest."1 Talcott and his staff also believed in stimulating patients' minds through activities. The hospital had educational classes, theater, and its own patient-run newspaper. The doctors also encouraged their wards to exercise, in the fresh air if possible, and soon settled upon baseball as a way to give male inmates a workout and provide a sort of therapy to other patients who could become attentive fans and focus on the game instead of their troubles. Baseball, the sole nationally popular team sport in America at the time, was not a new tool for mental health http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and Culture University of Nebraska Press

"Baseball for the Insane": The Middletown State Homeopathic Hospital and its "Asylums"

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/baseball-for-the-insane-the-middletown-state-homeopathic-hospital-and-qULSFLjeS8
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1534-1844
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

"Baseball for the Insane" The Middletown State Homeopathic Hospital and its "Asylums" james e. overmyer Dr. Selden Haines Talcott, superintendent of the Middletown State Homeopathic Hospital in Orange County, New York, had progressive ideas about how to treat the mentally ill. In a time not long after the basic treatment for "lunatics" was to warehouse them in asylums and poorhouses, Talcott believed a healthy mind should reside in a healthy body. As he put it, "the physical means for recuperating the worn and wasted systems of the insane may be stated in three words--heat, milk, and rest, and the greatest of these is rest."1 Talcott and his staff also believed in stimulating patients' minds through activities. The hospital had educational classes, theater, and its own patient-run newspaper. The doctors also encouraged their wards to exercise, in the fresh air if possible, and soon settled upon baseball as a way to give male inmates a workout and provide a sort of therapy to other patients who could become attentive fans and focus on the game instead of their troubles. Baseball, the sole nationally popular team sport in America at the time, was not a new tool for mental health

Journal

NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and CultureUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jul 21, 2011

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off