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Asserting Tribal Sovereignty through Compact Negotiations: A Case Study of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana

Asserting Tribal Sovereignty through Compact Negotiations: A Case Study of the Coushatta Tribe of... Asserting Tribal Sovereignty through Compact Negotiations A Case Study of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana Jay Precht In 2001 Lovelin Poncho, chairman of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana, declared the community's new gaming compact with the state "a win for southwest Louisiana, our local communities and for the tribe." The agreement included an unprecedented appendix that dictated how local non-Indian governments would divide Coushatta grants, required annual audits, and included a safeguard that decreased Coushatta payments if casino revenue fell. This agreement suggests that the Coushattas had successfully navigated what political scientists Jeff Corntassel and Richard C. Witmer call the "politics of perception" in the era of "forced federalism." According to Corntassel and Witmer, the increasing role of state governments in Indian affairs, highlighted by tribal-state compacts required for Indian casinos, marked a new era in federal Indian policy beginning in 1988 that increasingly forced tribal leaders to use new political strategies to deal with negative public perceptions of gaming tribes. Obstacles faced by tribal leaders during this new era include demands that gaming revenue fund state and local governments and assumptions by outsiders, including government officials, that tribes are unable to handle their new business ventures. As http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

Asserting Tribal Sovereignty through Compact Negotiations: A Case Study of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 41 (1) – Mar 26, 2017

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
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Abstract

Asserting Tribal Sovereignty through Compact Negotiations A Case Study of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana Jay Precht In 2001 Lovelin Poncho, chairman of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana, declared the community's new gaming compact with the state "a win for southwest Louisiana, our local communities and for the tribe." The agreement included an unprecedented appendix that dictated how local non-Indian governments would divide Coushatta grants, required annual audits, and included a safeguard that decreased Coushatta payments if casino revenue fell. This agreement suggests that the Coushattas had successfully navigated what political scientists Jeff Corntassel and Richard C. Witmer call the "politics of perception" in the era of "forced federalism." According to Corntassel and Witmer, the increasing role of state governments in Indian affairs, highlighted by tribal-state compacts required for Indian casinos, marked a new era in federal Indian policy beginning in 1988 that increasingly forced tribal leaders to use new political strategies to deal with negative public perceptions of gaming tribes. Obstacles faced by tribal leaders during this new era include demands that gaming revenue fund state and local governments and assumptions by outsiders, including government officials, that tribes are unable to handle their new business ventures. As

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Mar 26, 2017

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