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As Long As It's Big (review)

As Long As It's Big (review) Reviews eroticism. "Because we do not believe in original sin, / we'll praise these sweltering afternoons / picking blueberries with our daughter" ("From the Book of Summer"). This revised garden permits the presence of desire and the picking of fruit: redemption through the sensual, not despite it. The book ends with its title poem, "Book of the Unbroken Days," working in conjunction with the book's opening poem, "Days of Awe," and can be read as a gloss for the entire collection. Here is a resolution that shifts between history and modernity, between old and new conceptions of Judaism, binding the generations: "Later, our child rushes / from her room: // Papa! Mama! / There are people under our bed! / And I can't tell if / they're coming / or going." Past and present fuse together, an appropriate and moving conclusion. Even the Jewish child has learned to think herself part of a "community of the generations" ("My Wife Bathing Our Daughter"), tied to immediate family, to ancestors, to the more distant family of biblical figures, and to a family-yet-to-come. John Bricuth, As Long As It's Big, Johns Hopkins University Press Reviewed by Willis Regier Poems about unhappy http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prairie Schooner University of Nebraska Press

As Long As It's Big (review)

Prairie Schooner , Volume 80 (3)

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by the University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1542-426X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reviews eroticism. "Because we do not believe in original sin, / we'll praise these sweltering afternoons / picking blueberries with our daughter" ("From the Book of Summer"). This revised garden permits the presence of desire and the picking of fruit: redemption through the sensual, not despite it. The book ends with its title poem, "Book of the Unbroken Days," working in conjunction with the book's opening poem, "Days of Awe," and can be read as a gloss for the entire collection. Here is a resolution that shifts between history and modernity, between old and new conceptions of Judaism, binding the generations: "Later, our child rushes / from her room: // Papa! Mama! / There are people under our bed! / And I can't tell if / they're coming / or going." Past and present fuse together, an appropriate and moving conclusion. Even the Jewish child has learned to think herself part of a "community of the generations" ("My Wife Bathing Our Daughter"), tied to immediate family, to ancestors, to the more distant family of biblical figures, and to a family-yet-to-come. John Bricuth, As Long As It's Big, Johns Hopkins University Press Reviewed by Willis Regier Poems about unhappy

Journal

Prairie SchoonerUniversity of Nebraska Press

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