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"An Equal Interest in the Soil": Creek Small-Scale Farming and the Work of Nationhood, 1866–1889

"An Equal Interest in the Soil": Creek Small-Scale Farming and the Work of Nationhood, 1866–1889 "An Equal Interest in the Soil" Creek Small-Scale Farming the Work of Nationhood, 1866­1889 david a. chang One day in 1866 the McIntosh family learned that they were free. Prior to that day Jackson Hagar McIntosh their eight children had labored for their owner, Roley McIntosh. He was the micco (generally translated as "king") of the town of Coweta in the Creek Nation in present-day Oklahoma. Roley McIntosh, like some of the wealthiest men in the nation, had taken up arms for the Creek faction that had allied itself with the Confederacy in the American Civil War. The nation was split as another faction fought alongside Union forces. When Roley McIntosh's side lost a treaty of peace with the United States emancipated Creek slaves, he sent word that Jackson Hagar McIntosh, their children, his other slaves were freed. The good news did not stop there, however. More than six decades later one of the McIntosh daughters, Nellie, would still recall hearing the momentous news that "we . . . can take up some l for our own selves." After the war the McIntoshes stayed on the same l they had once farmed for their master. The l they http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

"An Equal Interest in the Soil": Creek Small-Scale Farming and the Work of Nationhood, 1866–1889

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 33 (1) – Jan 17, 2008

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
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Abstract

"An Equal Interest in the Soil" Creek Small-Scale Farming the Work of Nationhood, 1866­1889 david a. chang One day in 1866 the McIntosh family learned that they were free. Prior to that day Jackson Hagar McIntosh their eight children had labored for their owner, Roley McIntosh. He was the micco (generally translated as "king") of the town of Coweta in the Creek Nation in present-day Oklahoma. Roley McIntosh, like some of the wealthiest men in the nation, had taken up arms for the Creek faction that had allied itself with the Confederacy in the American Civil War. The nation was split as another faction fought alongside Union forces. When Roley McIntosh's side lost a treaty of peace with the United States emancipated Creek slaves, he sent word that Jackson Hagar McIntosh, their children, his other slaves were freed. The good news did not stop there, however. More than six decades later one of the McIntosh daughters, Nellie, would still recall hearing the momentous news that "we . . . can take up some l for our own selves." After the war the McIntoshes stayed on the same l they had once farmed for their master. The l they

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 17, 2008

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