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American Indian Oral History Manual: Making Many Voices Heard (review)

American Indian Oral History Manual: Making Many Voices Heard (review) learner of Hawaiian and now a graduate student at the University of Arizona, provides a general overview of technology applications among various Indigenous language communities, categorizing the different types of language materials production according to the level of technology used in their creation. Although the editors feature the last section of their book as an assessment of language revitalization efforts, Melissa Borgia's paper more precisely addresses issues of language learning assessment, an important dimension of language teaching efforts in school settings. Borgia's discussion about the Seneca CultureLanguage School in upstate New York illustrates the complexities of using and adapting existing mainstream standardized assessment protocols to determine the progress students are making in learning an Indigenous heritage language in a culturally focused education program. Borgia's paper as well as those of all the aforementioned authors surface a critical need to continue to examine and understand more fully the nature of Indigenous language learning as well as the implications for maintenance and revitalization efforts and the restrengthening of Indigenous languages as viable spoken languages. These discussions will undoubtedly be revisited in future symposia and hopefully expanded through ongoing collaborative research with Indigenous communities engaged in such efforts. Charles E. Trimble, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Indian Quarterly University of Nebraska Press

American Indian Oral History Manual: Making Many Voices Heard (review)

The American Indian Quarterly , Volume 34 (2) – Apr 2, 2010

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1534-1828
Publisher site
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Abstract

learner of Hawaiian and now a graduate student at the University of Arizona, provides a general overview of technology applications among various Indigenous language communities, categorizing the different types of language materials production according to the level of technology used in their creation. Although the editors feature the last section of their book as an assessment of language revitalization efforts, Melissa Borgia's paper more precisely addresses issues of language learning assessment, an important dimension of language teaching efforts in school settings. Borgia's discussion about the Seneca CultureLanguage School in upstate New York illustrates the complexities of using and adapting existing mainstream standardized assessment protocols to determine the progress students are making in learning an Indigenous heritage language in a culturally focused education program. Borgia's paper as well as those of all the aforementioned authors surface a critical need to continue to examine and understand more fully the nature of Indigenous language learning as well as the implications for maintenance and revitalization efforts and the restrengthening of Indigenous languages as viable spoken languages. These discussions will undoubtedly be revisited in future symposia and hopefully expanded through ongoing collaborative research with Indigenous communities engaged in such efforts. Charles E. Trimble,

Journal

The American Indian QuarterlyUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Apr 2, 2010

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