America the Beautiful: The Final Poems of Paula Gunn Allen (review)

America the Beautiful: The Final Poems of Paula Gunn Allen (review) where. Alongside these moments, however, is a level of bureaucratic and political detail that seems to deter the progress of Obermeyer's largely compelling narrative, as when he explains each of the "eight hypothetical options available to the Delaware for tribal enrollment" (some of which are not even legally possible) and each of the different cards and federal services available to holders of each "hypothetical option" (227). By the same token, however, Obermeyer's exposition of these complexities contributes to his implicit case against the U.S. government's inconsistent and convoluted policymaking strategies. In the final analysis the attainment of recognition seems to have detracted somewhat from the vitality of Obermeyer's argument, but this development does not undermine the book's importance in exploring this insufficiently explored aspect of Delaware history, its relevance to arguments about the Delawares separating further from the Cherokee Nation, or its applicability to other communities--like the Yuchi--that remain in a similar situation. In fact, these moments of comparison are among the most convincing of Delaware Tribe; a further investigation of such parallels would have extended the book's argument and perhaps made the 2009 recognition less of a shock to Obermeyer's project. Such comparative work is perhaps beyond http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

America the Beautiful: The Final Poems of Paula Gunn Allen (review)

Studies in American Indian Literatures, Volume 24 (2) – Jul 14, 2012

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © The individual contributors
ISSN
1548-9590
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Abstract

where. Alongside these moments, however, is a level of bureaucratic and political detail that seems to deter the progress of Obermeyer's largely compelling narrative, as when he explains each of the "eight hypothetical options available to the Delaware for tribal enrollment" (some of which are not even legally possible) and each of the different cards and federal services available to holders of each "hypothetical option" (227). By the same token, however, Obermeyer's exposition of these complexities contributes to his implicit case against the U.S. government's inconsistent and convoluted policymaking strategies. In the final analysis the attainment of recognition seems to have detracted somewhat from the vitality of Obermeyer's argument, but this development does not undermine the book's importance in exploring this insufficiently explored aspect of Delaware history, its relevance to arguments about the Delawares separating further from the Cherokee Nation, or its applicability to other communities--like the Yuchi--that remain in a similar situation. In fact, these moments of comparison are among the most convincing of Delaware Tribe; a further investigation of such parallels would have extended the book's argument and perhaps made the 2009 recognition less of a shock to Obermeyer's project. Such comparative work is perhaps beyond

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jul 14, 2012

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