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Against Écriture Féminine : Flaubert's Narrative Aggression in Madame Bovary

Against Écriture Féminine : Flaubert's Narrative Aggression in Madame Bovary Against Écriture Féminine Flaubert's Narrative Aggression in Madame Bovary Ashley Hope Pérez "Avec rage": Flaubert's Revenge "J'ai rempoigné la Bovary avec rage," Flaubert wrote to Louis Bouilhet two months after the end of his relationship with Louise Colet, the woman who had been lover, correspondent, and--perhaps most importantly--rival writer in Flaubert's eyes until the couple separated definitively in 1854.1 The letters to Colet, written over nearly a decade, attune us to the height of Flaubert's artistic aspirations and the extent of his insecurities. They also reveal the degree to which questions of aesthetic power and artistic identity become embroiled in Flaubert's problematic construction of the feminine, a construction that culminates in his writing of Madame Bovary as a portrait of female artistic failure. Throughout the letters, Flaubert expresses his desire to remake Colet in his image. "Je ne veux de toi, comme femme, que la chair. Que tout le reste donc soit à moi, ou mieux, soit moi, de même pâte et la même pâte," he writes, adding some months later, "Oh si je pouvais faire de toi ce que j'en rêve, quelle femme, quelle être tu serais!"2 Flaubert did not, however, get his wish. Although Colet's letters http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png French Forum University of Nebraska Press

Against Écriture Féminine : Flaubert's Narrative Aggression in Madame Bovary

French Forum , Volume 38 (3) – Apr 17, 2013

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 French Forum, Inc.
ISSN
1534-1836
Publisher site
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Abstract

Against Écriture Féminine Flaubert's Narrative Aggression in Madame Bovary Ashley Hope Pérez "Avec rage": Flaubert's Revenge "J'ai rempoigné la Bovary avec rage," Flaubert wrote to Louis Bouilhet two months after the end of his relationship with Louise Colet, the woman who had been lover, correspondent, and--perhaps most importantly--rival writer in Flaubert's eyes until the couple separated definitively in 1854.1 The letters to Colet, written over nearly a decade, attune us to the height of Flaubert's artistic aspirations and the extent of his insecurities. They also reveal the degree to which questions of aesthetic power and artistic identity become embroiled in Flaubert's problematic construction of the feminine, a construction that culminates in his writing of Madame Bovary as a portrait of female artistic failure. Throughout the letters, Flaubert expresses his desire to remake Colet in his image. "Je ne veux de toi, comme femme, que la chair. Que tout le reste donc soit à moi, ou mieux, soit moi, de même pâte et la même pâte," he writes, adding some months later, "Oh si je pouvais faire de toi ce que j'en rêve, quelle femme, quelle être tu serais!"2 Flaubert did not, however, get his wish. Although Colet's letters

Journal

French ForumUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Apr 17, 2013

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