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Adopting America: Childhood, Kinship, and National Identity in Literature , and: Claiming Others: Transracial Adoption and National Belonging , and: Kin of Another Kind: Transracial Adoption in American Literature (review)

Adopting America: Childhood, Kinship, and National Identity in Literature , and: Claiming Others:... ment-industry partnership) leaves the reader with no clue as to where the modern arts fit into American--thus popular--culture. In the end, though I read some portions with interest, I cannot recommend this book to any of its likely audiences. It breaks no new ground, so not to an expert on American cultural history or American popular culture. It is not always reliable, so not to a neophyte seeking a handy resource on American cultural history. The illustrations number only eleven, so not to the fan of Americana. In the end I might, with some sadness, recommend it to anyone looking for evidence that what used to be the gold standard--an academic book published by a reputable house--is no longer arguably superior to what can be found on the Internet. --Carol Loranger, Wright State University Adopting America: Childhood, Kinship, and National Identity in Literature, by Carol J. Singley. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. 224 pp. Cloth, $65.00. Claiming Others: Transracial Adoption and National Belonging, by Mark C. Jerng, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010. 352 pp. Cloth, $75.00. Kin of Another Kind: Transracial Adoption in American Literature, by Cynthia Callahan. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2010. 200 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Naturalism University of Nebraska Press

Adopting America: Childhood, Kinship, and National Identity in Literature , and: Claiming Others: Transracial Adoption and National Belonging , and: Kin of Another Kind: Transracial Adoption in American Literature (review)

Studies in American Naturalism , Volume 6 (1) – Feb 24, 2011

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1944-6519
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Abstract

ment-industry partnership) leaves the reader with no clue as to where the modern arts fit into American--thus popular--culture. In the end, though I read some portions with interest, I cannot recommend this book to any of its likely audiences. It breaks no new ground, so not to an expert on American cultural history or American popular culture. It is not always reliable, so not to a neophyte seeking a handy resource on American cultural history. The illustrations number only eleven, so not to the fan of Americana. In the end I might, with some sadness, recommend it to anyone looking for evidence that what used to be the gold standard--an academic book published by a reputable house--is no longer arguably superior to what can be found on the Internet. --Carol Loranger, Wright State University Adopting America: Childhood, Kinship, and National Identity in Literature, by Carol J. Singley. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. 224 pp. Cloth, $65.00. Claiming Others: Transracial Adoption and National Belonging, by Mark C. Jerng, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010. 352 pp. Cloth, $75.00. Kin of Another Kind: Transracial Adoption in American Literature, by Cynthia Callahan. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2010. 200

Journal

Studies in American NaturalismUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Feb 24, 2011

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