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Abortion and Human Rights for Women in Argentina

Abortion and Human Rights for Women in Argentina Abortion and Human Rights for Women in Argentina Barbara Sutton and Elizabeth Borland Introduction Legal abortion is one among several dimensions of a reproductive justice agenda, and yet it continues to be at the center of controversy in many places around the world. While in countries such as the United States abortion is le- gal but contested, in places such as Argentina, abortion is largely illegal, with few exceptions. Despite its criminalization, it is estimated that up to 522,000 abortions take place annually in Argentina. Abortion is also a leading cause of maternal mortality, and the clandestinity of the practice especially hurts the most destitute women. In this context, women’s movement and feminist ac- tivists in Argentina have long advocated for the legalization of abortion. Th eir cause gained momentum in the last decade. Unlike the more narrow emphasis on “choice” that has been prevalent in the United States and other contexts, and critiqued by scholars and activists advocating for “reproductive justice,” abortion rights activists in Argentina have included expansive frames in their discursive repertoire, even as they concentrate on legalizing abortion. One of these expansive frames pertains to the notion of human rights. Th e proliferation of human http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies uni_neb

Abortion and Human Rights for Women in Argentina

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © Frontiers Editorial Collective, Inc
ISSN
1536-0334

Abstract

Abortion and Human Rights for Women in Argentina Barbara Sutton and Elizabeth Borland Introduction Legal abortion is one among several dimensions of a reproductive justice agenda, and yet it continues to be at the center of controversy in many places around the world. While in countries such as the United States abortion is le- gal but contested, in places such as Argentina, abortion is largely illegal, with few exceptions. Despite its criminalization, it is estimated that up to 522,000 abortions take place annually in Argentina. Abortion is also a leading cause of maternal mortality, and the clandestinity of the practice especially hurts the most destitute women. In this context, women’s movement and feminist ac- tivists in Argentina have long advocated for the legalization of abortion. Th eir cause gained momentum in the last decade. Unlike the more narrow emphasis on “choice” that has been prevalent in the United States and other contexts, and critiqued by scholars and activists advocating for “reproductive justice,” abortion rights activists in Argentina have included expansive frames in their discursive repertoire, even as they concentrate on legalizing abortion. One of these expansive frames pertains to the notion of human rights. Th e proliferation of human

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studiesuni_neb

Published: Jul 25, 2019

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