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A Singular Case: Love and Trauma in Carmen Laforet's La isla y los demonios (1952)

A Singular Case: Love and Trauma in Carmen Laforet's La isla y los demonios (1952) A Singular Case Love and Trauma in Carmen Laforet’s La isla y los demonios (1952) CARAGH WELLS For as the botanist plucks one single fl ower fr om the endless abundance of the plant world and then analyses it so as to demonstrate to us the nature of the plant in general, so the poet selects a single scene, indeed sometimes no more than a single mood or sensation, fr om the endless confusion of ceaselessly ac- tive human life, in order to show us what the life and nature of man is. — Arthur Schopenhauer, Essays and Aphorisms, 159 Pathology has always done us the service of making discernible by isolation and exaggeration conditions which would remain concealed in a normal state. — Sigmund Freud, “Femininity,” 222 Both Schopenhauer’s and Freud’s observations arise from their knowledge and experience of the phenomenon of singularity: the poet’s capacity to pursue a general truth through the particularity of language, and the therapist’s recognition of how the individual traits of a human psyche perpetually illuminate our understanding of human existence. Schopenhauer noted art’s capacity to make “one single case stand[s] for thousands” in which the “careful and particular delineation of the individual http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Literature and Trauma Studies uni_neb

A Singular Case: Love and Trauma in Carmen Laforet's La isla y los demonios (1952)

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2045-4740

Abstract

A Singular Case Love and Trauma in Carmen Laforet’s La isla y los demonios (1952) CARAGH WELLS For as the botanist plucks one single fl ower fr om the endless abundance of the plant world and then analyses it so as to demonstrate to us the nature of the plant in general, so the poet selects a single scene, indeed sometimes no more than a single mood or sensation, fr om the endless confusion of ceaselessly ac- tive human life, in order to show us what the life and nature of man is. — Arthur Schopenhauer, Essays and Aphorisms, 159 Pathology has always done us the service of making discernible by isolation and exaggeration conditions which would remain concealed in a normal state. — Sigmund Freud, “Femininity,” 222 Both Schopenhauer’s and Freud’s observations arise from their knowledge and experience of the phenomenon of singularity: the poet’s capacity to pursue a general truth through the particularity of language, and the therapist’s recognition of how the individual traits of a human psyche perpetually illuminate our understanding of human existence. Schopenhauer noted art’s capacity to make “one single case stand[s] for thousands” in which the “careful and particular delineation of the individual

Journal

Journal of Literature and Trauma Studiesuni_neb

Published: Jun 12, 2018

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