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A Politics of Meeting: Reading Intersectional Indigenous Feminist Praxis in Lee Maracle's Sojourners and Sundogs

A Politics of Meeting: Reading Intersectional Indigenous Feminist Praxis in Lee Maracle's... A Politics of Meeting Reading Intersectional Indigenous Feminist Praxis in Lee Maracle's Sojourners and Sundogs Janey Lew Meetings are a common trope across many genres of feminist writing, and have been important sites for representing the ambivalent politics of collectivity, especially for queer, Indigenous, Third World women, and women of color who have actively contested mainstream feminist assumptions about subjectivity, collectivity, and solidarity. Theorizing solidarity across multiple lines of difference1 and intersectionality of differences in subject formation and coalitional politics2 are among the defining and most enduring contributions of racialized feminist thinkers and activists. In this essay I trace acclaimed author Lee Maracle's particular commitment to feminism and her articulation of Indigenous feminist praxis through close readings of meetings in her novel and short story collection Sojourners and Sundogs (1999). Maracle's feminist theorizing and storytelling are noteworthy for at least two reasons I discuss in this essay. First, as an Indigenous feminist who contests colonial hegemonies, Maracle situates her anti-imperialist, anti-racist feminist perspective transnationally, referencing examples, situations, events, ideas and discourses that cross, exceed, and resist national borders imposed by colonization. The affinities between Maracle's writing and discourses of black, Third World, women of color, and lesbian feminists, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

A Politics of Meeting: Reading Intersectional Indigenous Feminist Praxis in Lee Maracle's Sojourners and Sundogs

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies , Volume 38 (1) – Apr 12, 2017

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
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Abstract

A Politics of Meeting Reading Intersectional Indigenous Feminist Praxis in Lee Maracle's Sojourners and Sundogs Janey Lew Meetings are a common trope across many genres of feminist writing, and have been important sites for representing the ambivalent politics of collectivity, especially for queer, Indigenous, Third World women, and women of color who have actively contested mainstream feminist assumptions about subjectivity, collectivity, and solidarity. Theorizing solidarity across multiple lines of difference1 and intersectionality of differences in subject formation and coalitional politics2 are among the defining and most enduring contributions of racialized feminist thinkers and activists. In this essay I trace acclaimed author Lee Maracle's particular commitment to feminism and her articulation of Indigenous feminist praxis through close readings of meetings in her novel and short story collection Sojourners and Sundogs (1999). Maracle's feminist theorizing and storytelling are noteworthy for at least two reasons I discuss in this essay. First, as an Indigenous feminist who contests colonial hegemonies, Maracle situates her anti-imperialist, anti-racist feminist perspective transnationally, referencing examples, situations, events, ideas and discourses that cross, exceed, and resist national borders imposed by colonization. The affinities between Maracle's writing and discourses of black, Third World, women of color, and lesbian feminists,

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Apr 12, 2017

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