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A Pipe for February (review)

A Pipe for February (review) Book Reviews Charles H. Red Corn. A Pipe for February. American Indian Literature and Critical Studies Series, vol. 44. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2002. 269 pp. Barbara K. Robins A Pipe for February is a gentle story about violent times. Set in Oklahoma in 1924, the young members of oil wealthy Osage families carve out a social life for themselves in Pawhuska's boom town days. John Greyeagle, his cousins Molly and Evelyn Thunder, and Ted Bearsky are all in their twenties but their circumstances have not fully prepared them for the challenges of negotiating the conflicting values of the idle rich and the traditional elders of their community. In the introduction to his novel, Red Corn states: Our ancient culture was on a collision course with both good and evil forces of economics that would occur early in the nineteen hundreds when oil was discovered on our reservation. Some of our people abandoned the ancient teachings and some went a little crazy with wealth. Some of our people stood back and watched and tried to make sense of it in the context of the old culture. (n. pag.) Like other crime mysteries, there are details and clues http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Indian Literatures University of Nebraska Press

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Barbara K. Robins
ISSN
1548-9590
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews Charles H. Red Corn. A Pipe for February. American Indian Literature and Critical Studies Series, vol. 44. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2002. 269 pp. Barbara K. Robins A Pipe for February is a gentle story about violent times. Set in Oklahoma in 1924, the young members of oil wealthy Osage families carve out a social life for themselves in Pawhuska's boom town days. John Greyeagle, his cousins Molly and Evelyn Thunder, and Ted Bearsky are all in their twenties but their circumstances have not fully prepared them for the challenges of negotiating the conflicting values of the idle rich and the traditional elders of their community. In the introduction to his novel, Red Corn states: Our ancient culture was on a collision course with both good and evil forces of economics that would occur early in the nineteen hundreds when oil was discovered on our reservation. Some of our people abandoned the ancient teachings and some went a little crazy with wealth. Some of our people stood back and watched and tried to make sense of it in the context of the old culture. (n. pag.) Like other crime mysteries, there are details and clues

Journal

Studies in American Indian LiteraturesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 4, 2004

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