A New Critical Climate

A New Critical Climate AdELinE Johns-PutrA The environment today is replete with invisible, elusive, fearful, yet wholly "real" entities revealed to us by science: acid rain, ozone depletion, pesticide tolerance, carrying capacity, overpopulation, species loss and, most recently, climate change. --Sheila Jasanoff (2010, 235) We all know about climate change. We know that it is happening, if only because scientific consensus (though not certainty) has been translated into and accepted as general consensus. We know this--we specialist and non-specialist consenters to this consensus--on the basis of an agglomerate of evidence, including measurements of rapidly rising sea levels, shrinking ice sheets, diminishing Arctic ice thickness, accelerating global temperatures on both land and sea, and increasing ocean acidification. We thus know about climate change as a cluster of scientific facts. These facts--what Bruno Latour would call the "things" of science--have arrived through several layers of mediation (1990; 25-26). We encounter climate change most often as news or popular science sound-bites, usually exegeses of information reported by a body such as the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC), itself an attempt to collate and condense a vast amount of data from an array of scientific disciplines as reported in specialist journals. Those reported conclusions are http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png symploke University of Nebraska Press

A New Critical Climate

symploke, Volume 21 (1) – Dec 22, 2013

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 symploke.
ISSN
1534-0627
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AdELinE Johns-PutrA The environment today is replete with invisible, elusive, fearful, yet wholly "real" entities revealed to us by science: acid rain, ozone depletion, pesticide tolerance, carrying capacity, overpopulation, species loss and, most recently, climate change. --Sheila Jasanoff (2010, 235) We all know about climate change. We know that it is happening, if only because scientific consensus (though not certainty) has been translated into and accepted as general consensus. We know this--we specialist and non-specialist consenters to this consensus--on the basis of an agglomerate of evidence, including measurements of rapidly rising sea levels, shrinking ice sheets, diminishing Arctic ice thickness, accelerating global temperatures on both land and sea, and increasing ocean acidification. We thus know about climate change as a cluster of scientific facts. These facts--what Bruno Latour would call the "things" of science--have arrived through several layers of mediation (1990; 25-26). We encounter climate change most often as news or popular science sound-bites, usually exegeses of information reported by a body such as the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC), itself an attempt to collate and condense a vast amount of data from an array of scientific disciplines as reported in specialist journals. Those reported conclusions are

Journal

symplokeUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Dec 22, 2013

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