A Nation of Foreigners: Chateaubriand and Repatriation

A Nation of Foreigners: Chateaubriand and Repatriation <p>Abstract:</p><p>Though Chateaubriand is known as a great writer of exile, his memoirs present many instances of homecoming: his own in 1800, and those of Louis XVIII, his brother the comte d&apos;Artois, and the remaining <i>émigrés</i> in 1814. This article reads Chateaubriand&apos;s treatment of these homecomings in his memoirs alongside his political writings of 1814–18 to consider how Chateaubriand presents them as moments of national identity-crisis, and retrospectively adopts in the memoirs some of the very positions he had rejected under the Restoration. It also considers these themes in the newspaper <i>Le Conservateur</i>, whose founding in 1818 coincided with the final departure of the foreign troops from France. Using the central concept of "repatriation," I consider how Chateaubriand presented himself as the apostle of a unified image of Frenchness; yet also how that image was undermined by his own collaborators, who consistently underscored the irremediably fractured state of the fatherland.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nineteenth-Century French Studies University of Nebraska Press

A Nation of Foreigners: Chateaubriand and Repatriation

Nineteenth-Century French Studies, Volume 46 (3) – May 2, 2018

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1536-0172

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>Though Chateaubriand is known as a great writer of exile, his memoirs present many instances of homecoming: his own in 1800, and those of Louis XVIII, his brother the comte d&apos;Artois, and the remaining <i>émigrés</i> in 1814. This article reads Chateaubriand&apos;s treatment of these homecomings in his memoirs alongside his political writings of 1814–18 to consider how Chateaubriand presents them as moments of national identity-crisis, and retrospectively adopts in the memoirs some of the very positions he had rejected under the Restoration. It also considers these themes in the newspaper <i>Le Conservateur</i>, whose founding in 1818 coincided with the final departure of the foreign troops from France. Using the central concept of "repatriation," I consider how Chateaubriand presented himself as the apostle of a unified image of Frenchness; yet also how that image was undermined by his own collaborators, who consistently underscored the irremediably fractured state of the fatherland.</p>

Journal

Nineteenth-Century French StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: May 2, 2018

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