Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Gendered Economic History of Rural Households: Calvillo, Aguascalientes, Mexico, 1982-1991

A Gendered Economic History of Rural Households: Calvillo, Aguascalientes, Mexico, 1982-1991 María de los Angeles Crummet María de los Angeles Crummett During the past twenty years, the Mexican economy has been radically transformed. Economic liberalization and structural adjustment programs (SAP), designed to overcome the country's debt crisis and move Mexico into a more competitive position in the world economy, have had enormous implications for rural society. The crisis of the 1980s accelerated trends present in Mexico's agricultural sector since the mid-1960s, including growing poverty and landlessness, food dependency, and migration to urban centers and to the United States. Agricultural reforms implemented throughout the late 1980s and 1990s led to further economic deterioration as the Mexican government abandoned its longstanding support of agrarian programs providing subsidized resources to farmers. Research on the changes taking place in Mexico show that a gendered perspective is critical to our understanding of this dynamic, ongoing process of economic transformation. The policies and programs associated with structural reforms have had a disproportionately negative effect on women.1 In the rural sector, for example, as households attempt to defend their economic livelihoods under increasingly difficult conditions, women implement survival strategies for their families, intensifying their unpaid work in the household and in subsistence activities.2 While the literature http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

A Gendered Economic History of Rural Households: Calvillo, Aguascalientes, Mexico, 1982-1991

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/a-gendered-economic-history-of-rural-households-calvillo-x8MHF5xtMw
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

María de los Angeles Crummet María de los Angeles Crummett During the past twenty years, the Mexican economy has been radically transformed. Economic liberalization and structural adjustment programs (SAP), designed to overcome the country's debt crisis and move Mexico into a more competitive position in the world economy, have had enormous implications for rural society. The crisis of the 1980s accelerated trends present in Mexico's agricultural sector since the mid-1960s, including growing poverty and landlessness, food dependency, and migration to urban centers and to the United States. Agricultural reforms implemented throughout the late 1980s and 1990s led to further economic deterioration as the Mexican government abandoned its longstanding support of agrarian programs providing subsidized resources to farmers. Research on the changes taking place in Mexico show that a gendered perspective is critical to our understanding of this dynamic, ongoing process of economic transformation. The policies and programs associated with structural reforms have had a disproportionately negative effect on women.1 In the rural sector, for example, as households attempt to defend their economic livelihoods under increasingly difficult conditions, women implement survival strategies for their families, intensifying their unpaid work in the household and in subsistence activities.2 While the literature

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 4, 2001

There are no references for this article.