Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

"A Faithful Anatomy of Our Times": Reassessing Shirley Jackson

"A Faithful Anatomy of Our Times": Reassessing Shirley Jackson 05-N3494 7/12/05 6:27 AM Page 73 “A Faithful Anatomy of Our Times” Reassessing Shirley Jackson angela hague History has not been kind to Shirley Jackson. Today she is remembered almost entirely for her much-anthologized short story “The Lottery” (1948) and her 1959 novel The Haunting of Hill House, a fact that does not do justice to the number and complexity of the novels and short stories she produced. In his preface to a posthumously published collection of her work, The Magic of Shirley Jackson (1965), her husband, critic Stanley Edgar Hyman, wrote that “for all her popularity, Shirley Jackson won surprisingly little recognition. She received no awards or prizes, grants or fellowships; her name was often omit- ted from lists on which it clearly belonged, or which it should have led. She saw these honors go to inferior writers.” More optimistically, Hyman predicted that his wife’s “powerful visions of suffering and inhumanity” would be found “increasingly significant and meaningful,” that her work was among “that small body of literature produced in our time that seems apt to survive.” But in fact Jackson’s fiction, with the exception of the two works mentioned above, is rarely read or written about today; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

"A Faithful Anatomy of Our Times": Reassessing Shirley Jackson

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies , Volume 26 (2) – Aug 23, 2005

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-nebraska-press/a-faithful-anatomy-of-our-times-reassessing-shirley-jackson-A4owhy5tmf
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334

Abstract

05-N3494 7/12/05 6:27 AM Page 73 “A Faithful Anatomy of Our Times” Reassessing Shirley Jackson angela hague History has not been kind to Shirley Jackson. Today she is remembered almost entirely for her much-anthologized short story “The Lottery” (1948) and her 1959 novel The Haunting of Hill House, a fact that does not do justice to the number and complexity of the novels and short stories she produced. In his preface to a posthumously published collection of her work, The Magic of Shirley Jackson (1965), her husband, critic Stanley Edgar Hyman, wrote that “for all her popularity, Shirley Jackson won surprisingly little recognition. She received no awards or prizes, grants or fellowships; her name was often omit- ted from lists on which it clearly belonged, or which it should have led. She saw these honors go to inferior writers.” More optimistically, Hyman predicted that his wife’s “powerful visions of suffering and inhumanity” would be found “increasingly significant and meaningful,” that her work was among “that small body of literature produced in our time that seems apt to survive.” But in fact Jackson’s fiction, with the exception of the two works mentioned above, is rarely read or written about today;

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Aug 23, 2005

There are no references for this article.