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A Diplomat's Wife in Mexico: Creating Professional, Political, and National Identities in the Early Twentieth Century

A Diplomat's Wife in Mexico: Creating Professional, Political, and National Identities in the... A Diplomat's Wife in Mexico Creating Professional, Political, and National Identities in the Early Twentieth Century molly m. wood Early in 1916, Edith O'Shaughnessy, the wife of a former American diplomat, added the final touches to her first book, an account of her experiences in Mexico from 1911 to 1914. By publishing this book, which was marketed as a woman's travel narrative, O'Shaughnessy engaged in one of the primary narrative modes by which women in the early twentieth century entered into public discourse.1 O'Shaughnessy believed her book, A Diplomat's Wife in Mexico, would educate Americans about Mexico and about the troubled relationship between the United States and Mexico. The book, highly critical of President Woodrow Wilson's Mexican policies, was a rousing success. O'Shaughnessy capitalized on her new celebrity status by campaigning actively against Wilson in the upcoming presidential election. Her partisan activism, four years before the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment gave her the right to vote, reflects the already well documented political visibility of many middle-class and upper-middle-class white women in the early twentieth century.2 Yet O'Shaughnessy was not a typical female Progressive-era political activist. As the wife of an American diplomat, she had lived outside the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

A Diplomat's Wife in Mexico: Creating Professional, Political, and National Identities in the Early Twentieth Century

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies , Volume 25 (3) – Jun 12, 2003

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
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Abstract

A Diplomat's Wife in Mexico Creating Professional, Political, and National Identities in the Early Twentieth Century molly m. wood Early in 1916, Edith O'Shaughnessy, the wife of a former American diplomat, added the final touches to her first book, an account of her experiences in Mexico from 1911 to 1914. By publishing this book, which was marketed as a woman's travel narrative, O'Shaughnessy engaged in one of the primary narrative modes by which women in the early twentieth century entered into public discourse.1 O'Shaughnessy believed her book, A Diplomat's Wife in Mexico, would educate Americans about Mexico and about the troubled relationship between the United States and Mexico. The book, highly critical of President Woodrow Wilson's Mexican policies, was a rousing success. O'Shaughnessy capitalized on her new celebrity status by campaigning actively against Wilson in the upcoming presidential election. Her partisan activism, four years before the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment gave her the right to vote, reflects the already well documented political visibility of many middle-class and upper-middle-class white women in the early twentieth century.2 Yet O'Shaughnessy was not a typical female Progressive-era political activist. As the wife of an American diplomat, she had lived outside the

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jun 12, 2003

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