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A Cautionary Tale: On Limiting Epistemic Oppression

A Cautionary Tale: On Limiting Epistemic Oppression A Cautionary Tale On Limiting Epistemic Oppression kristie dotson I cannot recall the words of my first poem but I remember a promise I made my pen never to leave it lying in somebody else's blood. Audre Lorde, "To the Poet Who Happens to Be Black and the Black Poet Who Happens to Be a Woman"1 introduction In this paper, first and foremost, I aim to issue a caution. Specifically, I caution that when addressing and identifying forms of epistemic oppression one needs to endeavor not to perpetuate epistemic oppression. Epistemic oppression, here, refers to epistemic exclusions afforded positions and communities that produce deficiencies in social knowledge. An epistemic exclusion, in this analysis, is an infringement on the epistemic agency of knowers that reduces her or his ability to participate in a given epistemic community.2 Epistemic agency will concern the ability to utilize persuasively shared epistemic resources within a given epistemic community in order to participate in knowledge production and, if required, the revision of those same resources.3 A compromise to epistemic agency, when unwarranted, damages not only individual knowers but also the state of social knowledge and shared epistemic resources. Unfortunately, avoiding unwarranted epistemic exclusions is an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies University of Nebraska Press

A Cautionary Tale: On Limiting Epistemic Oppression

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies , Volume 33 (1) – Apr 20, 2012

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
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Abstract

A Cautionary Tale On Limiting Epistemic Oppression kristie dotson I cannot recall the words of my first poem but I remember a promise I made my pen never to leave it lying in somebody else's blood. Audre Lorde, "To the Poet Who Happens to Be Black and the Black Poet Who Happens to Be a Woman"1 introduction In this paper, first and foremost, I aim to issue a caution. Specifically, I caution that when addressing and identifying forms of epistemic oppression one needs to endeavor not to perpetuate epistemic oppression. Epistemic oppression, here, refers to epistemic exclusions afforded positions and communities that produce deficiencies in social knowledge. An epistemic exclusion, in this analysis, is an infringement on the epistemic agency of knowers that reduces her or his ability to participate in a given epistemic community.2 Epistemic agency will concern the ability to utilize persuasively shared epistemic resources within a given epistemic community in order to participate in knowledge production and, if required, the revision of those same resources.3 A compromise to epistemic agency, when unwarranted, damages not only individual knowers but also the state of social knowledge and shared epistemic resources. Unfortunately, avoiding unwarranted epistemic exclusions is an

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women StudiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Apr 20, 2012

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