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13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl by Mona Awad (review)

13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl by Mona Awad (review) Reviews Mona Awad. 13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl. Penguin Books. review by ursula villarreal-moura In 13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl, Mona Awad examines the body as a public object, a prison, a prize, and most interestingly as a passport to freedom or the pursuit of it. Billed as a novel, the book is structured as thirteen interconnected stories that trace the life of of a girl—from overweight, teenaged Lizzie, struggling to find her place, to thin Elizabeth, who has achieved weight loss but whose relationships are colored by her history. The opening story, ‘‘When We Went Against the Universe,’’ introduces us to Lizzie and her friend, Mel, two bored teens who flirt with the idea of approaching a group of businessmen eating at McDonald’s. Awad illustrates the restlessness of youth that results after the girls ‘‘[have] exhausted every topic of conversation,’’ eaten random desserts, and eventually consider prostituting themselves. Awad capitalizes on readers’ unease by deftly presenting the girls’ debate as juvenile, commonplace, and blind to any number of horrific ramifications. Many of the book’s sections are linked by the idea that the female body has a price; it can be negotiated, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prairie Schooner University of Nebraska Press

13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl by Mona Awad (review)

Prairie Schooner , Volume 90 (4) – Aug 9, 2016

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the University of Nebraska Press.
ISSN
1542-426X
Publisher site
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Abstract

Reviews Mona Awad. 13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl. Penguin Books. review by ursula villarreal-moura In 13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl, Mona Awad examines the body as a public object, a prison, a prize, and most interestingly as a passport to freedom or the pursuit of it. Billed as a novel, the book is structured as thirteen interconnected stories that trace the life of of a girl—from overweight, teenaged Lizzie, struggling to find her place, to thin Elizabeth, who has achieved weight loss but whose relationships are colored by her history. The opening story, ‘‘When We Went Against the Universe,’’ introduces us to Lizzie and her friend, Mel, two bored teens who flirt with the idea of approaching a group of businessmen eating at McDonald’s. Awad illustrates the restlessness of youth that results after the girls ‘‘[have] exhausted every topic of conversation,’’ eaten random desserts, and eventually consider prostituting themselves. Awad capitalizes on readers’ unease by deftly presenting the girls’ debate as juvenile, commonplace, and blind to any number of horrific ramifications. Many of the book’s sections are linked by the idea that the female body has a price; it can be negotiated,

Journal

Prairie SchoonerUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Aug 9, 2016

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