Would You Believe, and: Ophidia, and: Valediction, and: A Thousand Wires Humming

Would You Believe, and: Ophidia, and: Valediction, and: A Thousand Wires Humming ( p o et r y ) Miriam Bird Greenberg Would You Believe —r Th ee blocks from the Cyprus Freeway in Oakland, which collapsed in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, with a line by Sue Moon We climbed from the mouth of a volcano all year, the year I moved west with my sweetheart to live three blocks from where the earth had broken open. Men in the Acorn Projects remembered pulling strangers trapped in their cars to safety. Brother, one told me he’d said, we can be afraid of each other again tomorrow. Twenty years ae ft r, they’d made good on their promise. By then I waited weekly in a food line alongside Chinese immigrant women who fished plastic bottles from the trash, eyes roving for a coin, a lost prize, at the curb. Sometimes I’d lift my hand to the lip— look out over the volcano’s rim, and there, in a crevice, a scrap of paper shining: someone’s private prayer or prophecy. Everybody held out hope, tended their small hustle. Women knocked S u M M e r 2 0 1 5 / T H e M I S S O u r I r http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

Would You Believe, and: Ophidia, and: Valediction, and: A Thousand Wires Humming

The Missouri Review, Volume 38 (2) – Jun 24, 2015

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Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930

Abstract

( p o et r y ) Miriam Bird Greenberg Would You Believe —r Th ee blocks from the Cyprus Freeway in Oakland, which collapsed in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, with a line by Sue Moon We climbed from the mouth of a volcano all year, the year I moved west with my sweetheart to live three blocks from where the earth had broken open. Men in the Acorn Projects remembered pulling strangers trapped in their cars to safety. Brother, one told me he’d said, we can be afraid of each other again tomorrow. Twenty years ae ft r, they’d made good on their promise. By then I waited weekly in a food line alongside Chinese immigrant women who fished plastic bottles from the trash, eyes roving for a coin, a lost prize, at the curb. Sometimes I’d lift my hand to the lip— look out over the volcano’s rim, and there, in a crevice, a scrap of paper shining: someone’s private prayer or prophecy. Everybody held out hope, tended their small hustle. Women knocked S u M M e r 2 0 1 5 / T H e M I S S O u r I r

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Jun 24, 2015

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