Weeds

Weeds WEEDS I David Wagoner The usual definition o f a weed as a "plant out o f place" reflects human bias. - Alexander C. Martin, W eeds Crabgrass, ragweed, sandbur, plantain-- I knew them Better than lawnkeepers knew their favorite Square green grassbeds, better than gentlemen Of the turf knew edgers or rollers, clippers or sprinklers Whose neat bushes of water played More usefully than we did. In vacant lots and the cracks of concrete, we flourished As unobtrusively as we could, and as fast, In holes no one remembered digging, from decaying Compost heaps nobody ever used To feed the gardens weeds had been bom in, From which they were exiled. We never seemed out of place to me. I grew Invisibly like them by alleys, in gutters, At the ends of streets that no one superintended, By railroad beds-- a tumbleweed ready to break Away forever between dry roots And stem-base, joining the wind. T h e M i s s o u r i R e v ie w http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

Weeds

The Missouri Review, Volume 4 (1) – Aug 27, 1980

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Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

WEEDS I David Wagoner The usual definition o f a weed as a "plant out o f place" reflects human bias. - Alexander C. Martin, W eeds Crabgrass, ragweed, sandbur, plantain-- I knew them Better than lawnkeepers knew their favorite Square green grassbeds, better than gentlemen Of the turf knew edgers or rollers, clippers or sprinklers Whose neat bushes of water played More usefully than we did. In vacant lots and the cracks of concrete, we flourished As unobtrusively as we could, and as fast, In holes no one remembered digging, from decaying Compost heaps nobody ever used To feed the gardens weeds had been bom in, From which they were exiled. We never seemed out of place to me. I grew Invisibly like them by alleys, in gutters, At the ends of streets that no one superintended, By railroad beds-- a tumbleweed ready to break Away forever between dry roots And stem-base, joining the wind. T h e M i s s o u r i R e v ie w

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Aug 27, 1980

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