The Secret Meeting With Mr. Eliot

The Secret Meeting With Mr. Eliot THE SECRET MEETING WITH MR. ELIOT / Gloria Whelan Dear Professor Wally, This is not a poem about a cat. It is my life. I graduated from high school during the height (depth?) of the depression. Three students in my class went to college. Although I was valedictorian (Latin: valedictus, bidden goodbye) and spoke on "The Promise of the Future," I was not one of them. An excellent seamstress, even at that early age, I was fortunate to find a position in the yard goods department of a large store where I worked as a saleswoman (I will not neuter myself for any women's movement). I enjoyed my job. When a customer held a pattern in one hand and a bolt of material in the other, it was a moment full of possibilities. I seldom had to see the finished product which likely had poorly set-in sleeves and an uneven hemline. Apart from a brief leave when the children were small, I worked there for twenty-eight years. In those days women were not promoted. When I retired, I was still a saleswoman, while the buyer was a girl of twenty-three, a management trainee who couldn't tell a tailor http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

The Secret Meeting With Mr. Eliot

The Missouri Review, Volume 6 (2) – Oct 5, 1983

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-missouri/the-secret-meeting-with-mr-eliot-UbuPufV9tm
Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE SECRET MEETING WITH MR. ELIOT / Gloria Whelan Dear Professor Wally, This is not a poem about a cat. It is my life. I graduated from high school during the height (depth?) of the depression. Three students in my class went to college. Although I was valedictorian (Latin: valedictus, bidden goodbye) and spoke on "The Promise of the Future," I was not one of them. An excellent seamstress, even at that early age, I was fortunate to find a position in the yard goods department of a large store where I worked as a saleswoman (I will not neuter myself for any women's movement). I enjoyed my job. When a customer held a pattern in one hand and a bolt of material in the other, it was a moment full of possibilities. I seldom had to see the finished product which likely had poorly set-in sleeves and an uneven hemline. Apart from a brief leave when the children were small, I worked there for twenty-eight years. In those days women were not promoted. When I retired, I was still a saleswoman, while the buyer was a girl of twenty-three, a management trainee who couldn't tell a tailor

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Oct 5, 1983

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off