Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Meat Must Float

The Meat Must Float Background photo by Michael Denne; family photos courtesy of the author E S S AY Sharon F. Doorasamy Invite as many people as you want. That’s what I tell Neela, my mother-in-law. But she sucks her teeth and says, “I have no thick or thin friends.” Translated, this means she is not going to invite anyone to my baby’s christen- ing. I know better. The one thing I have learned for sure during the relatively short time I have come to know my mother-in-law and, by extension, Indians in South Africa, is to always ask three times. Background photo by Michael Denne; family photos courtesy of the author We spend all Sundays at my mother-in-law’s house. She and my father- in-law, “George Police,” live in Park Rynie, a small coastal town on the Indian Ocean side of South Africa. To get to Park Rynie, where the Ind -i ans live, you drive through Scottburgh, where the whites live, and to get to Scottburgh, you must drive past Umgababa, where the Zulus live. e Th re’s no grass and hardly any trees to speak of where the Zulus live—mostly bald-headed land, scattered rondavels and cinder-block houses in various states of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

The Meat Must Float

The Missouri Review , Volume 41 (1) – Apr 10, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-missouri/the-meat-must-float-ZPset5tOOY
Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930

Abstract

Background photo by Michael Denne; family photos courtesy of the author E S S AY Sharon F. Doorasamy Invite as many people as you want. That’s what I tell Neela, my mother-in-law. But she sucks her teeth and says, “I have no thick or thin friends.” Translated, this means she is not going to invite anyone to my baby’s christen- ing. I know better. The one thing I have learned for sure during the relatively short time I have come to know my mother-in-law and, by extension, Indians in South Africa, is to always ask three times. Background photo by Michael Denne; family photos courtesy of the author We spend all Sundays at my mother-in-law’s house. She and my father- in-law, “George Police,” live in Park Rynie, a small coastal town on the Indian Ocean side of South Africa. To get to Park Rynie, where the Ind -i ans live, you drive through Scottburgh, where the whites live, and to get to Scottburgh, you must drive past Umgababa, where the Zulus live. e Th re’s no grass and hardly any trees to speak of where the Zulus live—mostly bald-headed land, scattered rondavels and cinder-block houses in various states of

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Apr 10, 2018

There are no references for this article.