The Immortal Count: The Life and Films of Bela Lugosi (review)

The Immortal Count: The Life and Films of Bela Lugosi (review) you just have to cope as best you can. Instead of elevating Christopher to an innocent savant whose simplicity shames the rest of us, Haddon shows us the horror of autism and the havoc it wreaks on parents. If there is any remaining inclination on the reader's part to romanticize the autistic mind, there is the nightmare of Christopher's favorite dream: "Nearly everyone on earth is dead, because they have caught a virus. . . . And eventually there is no one left in the world except people who don't look at other people's faces. . . . And I can go anywhere in the world and I know that no one is going to talk to me or touch me or ask me a question." What to do with such a child? The answer is the same as for any child: love him. Perhaps Haddon's greatest triumph is that we really believe it when Christopher's parents say, "I love you." More importantly, we really believe it when Christopher says, "I love you" back. But expressions of love, like most information, are just approximate. Only with an autistic child, they're more so. (PS) The Immortal Count: The Life http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

The Immortal Count: The Life and Films of Bela Lugosi (review)

The Missouri Review, Volume 27 (2) – Oct 8, 2004

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Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930
Publisher site
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Abstract

you just have to cope as best you can. Instead of elevating Christopher to an innocent savant whose simplicity shames the rest of us, Haddon shows us the horror of autism and the havoc it wreaks on parents. If there is any remaining inclination on the reader's part to romanticize the autistic mind, there is the nightmare of Christopher's favorite dream: "Nearly everyone on earth is dead, because they have caught a virus. . . . And eventually there is no one left in the world except people who don't look at other people's faces. . . . And I can go anywhere in the world and I know that no one is going to talk to me or touch me or ask me a question." What to do with such a child? The answer is the same as for any child: love him. Perhaps Haddon's greatest triumph is that we really believe it when Christopher's parents say, "I love you." More importantly, we really believe it when Christopher says, "I love you" back. But expressions of love, like most information, are just approximate. Only with an autistic child, they're more so. (PS) The Immortal Count: The Life

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Oct 8, 2004

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