The End of Those Things

The End of Those Things THE END OF THOSE THINGS/PM/p Gould i. April 1956 ABOARD THE TEN A.M. ferry from Algeciras, among the crowd of passengers, Moroccans, Spanish, French, English, Italians, Germans, others who could not so easily be identified at sight, three Americans occupied standing room on an open deck: Ben Sinclair, on assignment from the Paris bureau of the New York Times, and Jay ParneU Powell and Joseph Comerford, both of them simply, or not so simply, travelers traveling together, unemployed, though for a while weUenough financed. Sinclair thought PoweU was about thirty-two or -three. Comerford appeared to be in his early twenties, a pale, seriouslooking young man, black Irish, shy and stiff in black dress shoes, brown trousers, a black raincoat, collar up. His black Basque beret seemed worn primarily to keep his head warm in the wind. Still, in more stylish clothes and after a few days in the sun, he would be presentable enough, Sinclair thought. Powell, in contrast, was ill-favored by nature. Congenitally pudgy, he had an oversized head, reddish hair, thinning and wild, and a potato nose. It seemed unfair that he should also be cursed with bad teeth and weak eyes behind steel-rimmed glasses that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

The End of Those Things

The Missouri Review, Volume 22 (3) – Oct 5, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-missouri/the-end-of-those-things-hyKudCkwpW
Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE END OF THOSE THINGS/PM/p Gould i. April 1956 ABOARD THE TEN A.M. ferry from Algeciras, among the crowd of passengers, Moroccans, Spanish, French, English, Italians, Germans, others who could not so easily be identified at sight, three Americans occupied standing room on an open deck: Ben Sinclair, on assignment from the Paris bureau of the New York Times, and Jay ParneU Powell and Joseph Comerford, both of them simply, or not so simply, travelers traveling together, unemployed, though for a while weUenough financed. Sinclair thought PoweU was about thirty-two or -three. Comerford appeared to be in his early twenties, a pale, seriouslooking young man, black Irish, shy and stiff in black dress shoes, brown trousers, a black raincoat, collar up. His black Basque beret seemed worn primarily to keep his head warm in the wind. Still, in more stylish clothes and after a few days in the sun, he would be presentable enough, Sinclair thought. Powell, in contrast, was ill-favored by nature. Congenitally pudgy, he had an oversized head, reddish hair, thinning and wild, and a potato nose. It seemed unfair that he should also be cursed with bad teeth and weak eyes behind steel-rimmed glasses that

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Oct 5, 1999

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off