The Children (review)

The Children (review) of living as tourists in the jungle. tells a story that is both frightening and real. In the tradition of Heart of Darkness or The Turn of the Screw, she weds gothicism and realism to show how a place may become malevolent, and how a lack of self-awareIn acutely sensuous prose, Gillison take a daily bike ride, alone, through town. John Lewis leads a march across Petrus Bridge in Selma, know- because "The horror!" is witnessed ness may be lethal. In some ways, The Undiscovered Country is more frightening than these two classics from the inside. (SM) The Children ing he may be killed on the other side. In the end, Halberstam amply shows, small acts of great courage changed America. Unfortunately, Halberstam's execution of the story leaves a great deal to be desired. Especially in the later sections, the book often reads as if it were written by a committee. And while turgid prose is perhaps excusable in a work of this length and and poor punctuation are not. For example, at one point Colia Layfette is said to know that "her father's scope, bad grammar, malapropisms Random House, 1998, 783 pp., $29.95 Taylor Branch's 1988 Parting the Waters told the story of the civil rights movement through the eyes of the movement's leaders: Martin Luther by David Halberstam people came from Sudan and her mother's from Africa," as if Sudan were not in Africa. Later Halberstam King, Jr., Ralph Abernathy, A. Phillip Randolph and others. As its title implies, David Halberstam's The Children tells the story through the eyes of the foot soldiers of the movement. Specifically, Halberstam focuses on a group of students in Nashville who formed their nonviolent con- points out that after Martin Luther King's assassination, there was no one left in the movement who could sciousness under the tutelage of VanThese young people came from all united by their revulsion at America's institutionalized racism. derbilt divinity student Jim Lawson. "reign in" (sic) the irascible James Bevel. In addition to many errors of this kind, there are countless tiny lapses: quotation marks and parentheses that do not close, missing periods, etc. AU of this, in the end, makes The Children a sloppy telling of a great story. One wonders where the proofreader was. (WJ) different regions and classes but were The Short History of a Prince by Jane Hamilton The actions of the individuals involved are breathtaking in their idealism and daring. One young woman, Random House, 1998, 349 pp., $23 Walter McCloud yearns to belong Diane Nash, puts Nashville's mayor in his place on the courthouse steps. Bernard Lafayette moves with his wife to Selma, Alabama, to organize to the competitive world of classical ballet. He's a great dancer in his mind, heart and soul. Unfortunately, not make up for his physical shortcomings: spindly legs, nearly flat voters. Despite the open hostility 204 · The Missouri Review all the passion in the world will toward his cause, he isn't afraid to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Missouri Review University of Missouri

The Children (review)

The Missouri Review, Volume 21 (3) – Oct 5, 1998

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Publisher
University of Missouri
Copyright
Copyright © The Curators of the University of Missouri.
ISSN
1548-9930
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

of living as tourists in the jungle. tells a story that is both frightening and real. In the tradition of Heart of Darkness or The Turn of the Screw, she weds gothicism and realism to show how a place may become malevolent, and how a lack of self-awareIn acutely sensuous prose, Gillison take a daily bike ride, alone, through town. John Lewis leads a march across Petrus Bridge in Selma, know- because "The horror!" is witnessed ness may be lethal. In some ways, The Undiscovered Country is more frightening than these two classics from the inside. (SM) The Children ing he may be killed on the other side. In the end, Halberstam amply shows, small acts of great courage changed America. Unfortunately, Halberstam's execution of the story leaves a great deal to be desired. Especially in the later sections, the book often reads as if it were written by a committee. And while turgid prose is perhaps excusable in a work of this length and and poor punctuation are not. For example, at one point Colia Layfette is said to know that "her father's scope, bad grammar, malapropisms Random House, 1998, 783 pp., $29.95 Taylor Branch's 1988 Parting the Waters told the story of the civil rights movement through the eyes of the movement's leaders: Martin Luther by David Halberstam people came from Sudan and her mother's from Africa," as if Sudan were not in Africa. Later Halberstam King, Jr., Ralph Abernathy, A. Phillip Randolph and others. As its title implies, David Halberstam's The Children tells the story through the eyes of the foot soldiers of the movement. Specifically, Halberstam focuses on a group of students in Nashville who formed their nonviolent con- points out that after Martin Luther King's assassination, there was no one left in the movement who could sciousness under the tutelage of VanThese young people came from all united by their revulsion at America's institutionalized racism. derbilt divinity student Jim Lawson. "reign in" (sic) the irascible James Bevel. In addition to many errors of this kind, there are countless tiny lapses: quotation marks and parentheses that do not close, missing periods, etc. AU of this, in the end, makes The Children a sloppy telling of a great story. One wonders where the proofreader was. (WJ) different regions and classes but were The Short History of a Prince by Jane Hamilton The actions of the individuals involved are breathtaking in their idealism and daring. One young woman, Random House, 1998, 349 pp., $23 Walter McCloud yearns to belong Diane Nash, puts Nashville's mayor in his place on the courthouse steps. Bernard Lafayette moves with his wife to Selma, Alabama, to organize to the competitive world of classical ballet. He's a great dancer in his mind, heart and soul. Unfortunately, not make up for his physical shortcomings: spindly legs, nearly flat voters. Despite the open hostility 204 · The Missouri Review all the passion in the world will toward his cause, he isn't afraid to

Journal

The Missouri ReviewUniversity of Missouri

Published: Oct 5, 1998

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